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National Comic Book Day!

hornbakelibrary:

Thursday, September 25th is National Comic Book Day. Read more about the great comic book collections in Hornbake Library.

Originally posted on Gordon W. Prange Collection:

BLOG_ComicsSeptember 25th is National Comic Book Day!  It’s a great opportunity for us to bring the 2,000 comic books in the Prange Collection to your attention.  They have all been digitized and are available in the Prange Digital Children’s Book Collection (please note that due to copyright restrictions, full-text access is limited to the University of Maryland, College Park campus or onsite at the National Diet Library of Japan).

In the Collection, you will find familiar titles, such as:

  • Metoro porisu ” by Tezuka Osamu (Prange Call Number: 466-064)
  • Norakuro sannintabi”  by Tagawa Suiho (Prange Call Number: 475-071)
  • Sazaesan” by Hasegawa Machiko  (Prange Call Number: 461-002)

See this blog post for the recent discovery of a comic book written by Komatsu Sakyo, a well-known science fiction writer, in the Prange Digital Children’s Book Collection.   The discovery made national news in Japan.

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Guest Lecture on “The Advertising Film Before Commercial Broadcasting “

Novelty News, May 1911

Novelty News, May 1911

Special Collections in Mass Media & Culture is pleased to announce an upcoming guest lecture presented by Martin Johnson, Assistant Professor of Media Studies at Catholic University on:

  • Date: Tuesday, October 21st
  • Time: 4:30pm
  • Location: 3rd floor instruction space in Hornbake Library North

The title of Dr. Johnson’s lecture is, “The Best Advertisement Will Never Be Written”: The Advertising Film Before Commercial Broadcasting.” He will discuss the attempts by producers of industrial films in the 1910s to create moving-image advertisements and, despite early setbacks due to resistance within the motion picture industry, the subsequent success of using non-theatrical spaces as advertising platforms.

Judicious Advertising, December 1912

Judicious Advertising, December 1912

“By locating these advertising films within a diverse media landscape,” Johnson claims, “it becomes possible to trace the emergence of ‘useful’ mass media in the early 20th century.”

The lecture is free and open to the public. Students in Communication and Film Studies are especially encouraged to attend. A reception will follow Dr. Johnson’s presentation.

Questions? Contact Mike Henry, Research Specialist, at mlhenry@umd.edu.

Driving and parking directions

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Announcing “A Colony in Crisis”

A Colony in CrisisWe are happy to announce the debut of the Colony in Crisis website, where you will find a collection of digitized and translated French pamphlets dealing with the Saint-Domingue grain shortage of 1789. To facilitate access to each pamphlet, we have brought together the French original, a brief historical introduction, and a translation. While the subject matter will be of interest to those interested in a variety of fields such as Atlantic History, the Ancien Régime, and the Haitian Revolution, the primary goal of A Colony in Crisis is to get these fascinating and underutilized pamphlets into more hands and shed light on an interesting chapter in the history of Saint-Domingue. We expect it will be especially useful for undergraduate courses needing primary source materials that have been translated into English, but we welcome feedback as to the many other potential uses. Thank you to the Board of Advisors and the many colleagues who contributed; without their assistance the site would not be going live today!

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Class Assignments in Special Collections and University Archives

Not only can can make requests, place duplication orders, and manage your special collections research online, now it’s easier for professors to collaborate with special collections staff to organize class tours and assignments using our collections.

Get started by registering online

Once you register, you will be able to remotely request materials from Special Collections and University Archives, the Prange Collection, and Special Collections in Preforming Arts. The first time you visit the reading room after registering, you will be asked to present a valid university-issued or government-issued photo ID to confirm your identity.

With a special collections research account, collaborating with special collections staff on classes and tours is easier than ever. Is there a set of primary sources you would like to use for a class assignment? Professors can create a list of materials on a particular subject, request them using their research account, and keep the materials on hold in the Maryland Room for their class. Students can visit the Maryland Room to access the materials quickly, spending more time doing their research. Teaching the class again next semester? With your research account, you can pull up your request history and have special collections staff place the same materials on hold again.

Visit the reading room in person for help from special collections staff setting up your account and to inquire about using Special Collections and University Archives materials for a class assignment or tour.

For more information, follow us @hornbakeLibrary on Twitter or follow Special Collections and University Archives on WordPress.

Have questions? Contact us

 Best Friends

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Online Requesting Is Here!

Now you can make requests, place duplication orders, and manage your special collections research online.

Get started by registering online

Once you register, you will be able to remotely request materials from Special Collections and University Archives, the Prange Collection, and Special Collections in Preforming Arts. The first time you visit the reading room after registering, you will be asked to present a valid university-issued or government-issued photo ID to confirm your identity.

To request materials, click on the ‘Request from Special Collections’ link located in the online catalog or finding aid. You may request up to 15 books or boxes at a time. Need more? Don’t worry, you can make additional requests in the reading room. You can also schedule your requests so they are placed on hold when you plan to visit the reading room.

Visit the reading room in person for help from special collections staff setting up your account and placing requests.

For more information, follow us @hornbakeLibrary on Twitter or follow Special Collections and University Archives on WordPress.

Have questions? Contact us

Breakfast Club

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Aeon 101: ORDERING SCANS AND PHOTOCOPIES

Starting August 1, all researchers using Special Collections and University Archives, the Prange Collection, and Special Collections in Performing Arts at the University of Maryland will need to create an online account to use materials in the reading room. We know you will have questions about the new policy, and we are here to help!

HOW WILL ORDERING SCANS AND PHOTOCOPIES BE DIFFERENT?

One of the exciting change is that researchers will be able to place photoduplication orders online. This makes it easier to submit orders and allows you to monitor your photocopy or scanning orders, including the current status of the order and cost. You can also retrieve an invoice for the completed order through your account.

The process for ordering photocopies and scans works very much like requesting an item.  You start the process directly from the catalog record or finding aid or within your account.  For example, a researcher who visited the Maryland Room to view and 1897 edition of ‘Through the Looking Glass’, selects ‘New Photoduplication Request':

AeonAlicePhotocopyRequest

Click on the image for a larger view.

The researcher then fills in the details of their photoduplication request, including the pages they want copied, format options, shipping options, service level options, and other special requests.  By clicking ‘Submit Request’ , the researcher sends the order to special collections staff for processing.

AeonPhotocopyAlice

Click on the image for a larger view.

You can track the status from this screen as special collections staff create an invoice, process payment, and delivers the item to you.  Another exciting change is that researchers requesting digital copies will be able to retrieve their files online through this account!

All your reading room requests, including photoduplication orders are easily accessible online in one location. It will help you better manage your requests and organize your special collections research. Special collections staff will continue to provide information about these changes leading up to, and following the August 1 launch.

Until then, follow us @hornbakeLibrary on Twitter or sign up to follow Special Collections and University Archives on wordpress.

Have questions? Contact us

 Grumpy Cat Aeon

 

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Aeon 101: REQUESTING MATERIALS

Starting August 1, all researchers using Special Collections and University Archives, the Prange Collection, and Special Collections in Performing Arts at the University of Maryland will need to create an online research account to use materials in the reading room. We know you will have questions about the new policy, and we are here to help!

HOW DO I REQUEST MATERIALS?

On August 1, researchers can request materials directly from a finding aid or online catalog. You can do this online or in the reading room with the help of a librarian.

No more writing call numbers on scraps of paper,  forgetting the name of a collection once you get to the reading room, or trying to decipher messy research notes.  Requesting materials from special collections will be more accurate and easier. Some of the benefits include:

  • Request materials online from any computer.
  • Request materials when the reading room is closed.
  • Schedule your requests in advance so that materials are on hold when you arrive
  • Track the status of your requests to see when the request has been received, retrieved, or placed on hold.
  • No more surprises! Special collections staff will contact you in case of any problems with your request. And because you request materials directly from the finding aid or catalog record, you can verify that the material you requested is correct.

Starting Aug 1, you will notice a ‘Request from Special Collections’ link in our online catalog and finding aids. Below is an example of what the catalog record will look like:

aeonalicerecord

Click on the image for a larger view.

If you were interested in viewing this item, you would begin by clicking on the ‘Request from Special Collections’ link.   This will prompt you to log in to your account. Once logged in, you can verify their request and select what day you will visit the reading room:

Aeonnewrequest

Click on the image for a larger view.

You will verify the call number, title, and other information for this item and click ‘Submit Request’.  It’s that easy! Once the request is submitted, it will appear in your account along with any other requests and their current status:

AeonAlicequeue

Click on the image for a larger view.

If you are unsure how to request materials, or need some additional guidance, don’t worry.  Special collection staff in the reading room will be happy to walk you through the registration process, assist with requesting materials, and answer any other questions you may have.  In the meantime, we will continue to provide information about Aeon leading up to, and following the August 1 launch.

Until then, follow us @hornbakeLibrary on Twitter or sign up to follow Special Collections and University Archives on WordPress.

Have questions? Contact us

Larry David Aeon

 

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