Hemingway2

Christmas Greetings from Special Collections

Celebrate the holidays with these yuletide selections from Special Collections and University Archives!

Our Robert Frost Collection includes beautifully printed and designed Christmas Cards, also known as chapbooks,  featuring poetry by Robert Frost.  Printed by the Spiral Press, the idea for these cards began in 1930 not by Frost, but the founder of the Spiral Press Joseph Blumenthal. With’s Frost involvement, a new card was published annually until 1962. While not all overtly Christmas-themed, the poems have Frosts’ unmistakable rural charm.

Many notable authors and poets looked for inspiration in Christmastime, from the humorous to the introspective. Works by Ernest Hemingway, Ogden Nash, T.S. Eliot, H.L. Menken, Louisa May Alcott, and many more can be found in Special Collections and University Archives.

Looking for something more classic? The Kelmscott Press, a fine printing press started by English author and socialist WIlliam Morris (1834-1896), printed a wonderful edition of ‘Good King Wenceslas‘, illustrated by Arthur J. Gaskin. Also in our Rare Book collection is a copy of ‘The Night Before Christmas’, printed in 1899. This edition, issued by famed New York City Bookshop Brentanos, is illustrated by J. C. Chase.

Visit the Maryland Room in when we re-open on January 4th and explore more from our collections!

 

Brewers converge in Baltimore in 1878

As last Sunday was the final day of Oktoberfest in Germany, it seems only fitting that we should feature beer in today’s blog post from the Historic Maryland Newspapers Project.

The June 5, 1878, issue of Der Deutsche Correspondent contains a special supplement that I first noticed because it bears several large and intricate illustrations. The largest and central illustration features King Gambrinus—the fabled patriarch of brewing—with a stein of beer in one hand and the other outstretched, welcoming brewers from all over the country to Baltimore.

Illustration features King Gambrinus—the fabled patriarch of brewing—with a stein of beer in one hand and the other outstretched, welcoming brewers from all over the country to Baltimore. The translated caption reads: “18th National Brewers’ Congress of the United States, held in the City of Baltimore on the 4th, 5th, 6th and 7th of June 1878.”

The translated caption reads: “18th National Brewers’ Congress of the United States, held in the City of Baltimore on the 4th, 5th, 6th and 7th of June 1878.”

Discussion at the 18th National Brewers’ Congress of the United States revolved around the hot topics of the day, predominantly the temperance movement. Brewers attempted to avoid the persecution of teetotalers by promoting the idea that beer could be a milder, and therefore less dangerous, alternative to hard liquors. A June 6, 1878, article from the Baltimore Sun quotes President of the National Brewers Association Henry H. Reuter as saying:

“We do not differ with them [supporters of the Temperance Movement] concerning the evils of drunkenness, the mischief, the poverty and the crime thereby engendered; we differ as to the means to be employed to lessen these deplorable results of intoxication, and so reach results in which we are all interested. It is not a moral, but an intellectual difference.… Experience is the safest guide, and experience teaches us that all efforts to suppress the gratification of the human appetite for stimulants have failed.… We believe, finally, that in the popular consumption of ale and beer is found one of the best safeguards in controlling the desire for stimulants, and that they, above all others, are best adapted to satisfy the appetite for alcoholic stimulants with the least danger of abuse.”

Attendees of the conference also had the opportunity to tour several of Baltimore’s prominent breweries—including H. Strauss Bros. & Bell, J. H. Von der Horst’s, and Louis Muth’s and Rost’s—and sample their brews.

Image of John H. Van Der Horst. Brauer und Mälzer, verlängerte Belair-Avenue, Baltimore, Md.   Image of Louis Muth's Lagerbier-Brauerei, Belair-Avenue, Baltimore, Md.

Inaugural post of the Historic Maryland Newspapers Project

Have you ever had to do research that involved looking at newspapers on microfilm? If so, then you know that it can be a tedious process. After hours of scrolling through reels of microfilm, patiently scanning each page to find the information you need, at long last you’ll find the one sentence of an article that proves your thesis correct—or at least hopefully you will! I’m sure at several times throughout the course of your research you thought to yourself, “This would be so much easier if I could just do a keyword search of this whole newspaper. And it would be great if I could do it from home. In my pajamas.” Luckily, some folks at the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and Library of Congress agree!

Through August 2014 the NEH will fund the Historic Maryland Newspapers Project at the University of Maryland Libraries through a National Digital Newspaper Program (NDNP) grant. Our project will digitize 100,000 pages of newspaper content from the state of Maryland and make it free and searchable via the Library of Congress’ Chronicling America digital newspaper collection. Chronicling America allows users to search over 6.6 million newspaper pages by title, date or location of publication, and keyword.*

The first title to be digitized by the Historic Maryland Newspapers Project is Der Deutsche Correspondent. This German-language newspaper was published in Baltimore from 1841 to 1918.

Image of the offices of Der Deutsche Correspondent in Baltimore, MD from the June 5, 1878 issue of the newspaper.

Image of the offices of Der Deutsche Correspondent in Baltimore, MD from the June 5, 1878 issue of the newspaper.

We hope you’ll join us for a series of posts about Maryland’s newspapers, including a preview of some of the fascinating content we’ve stumbled upon so far in Der Deutsche Correspondent! More to come soon!

*Since Chronicling America is hosted by the Library of Congress, you’ll have to wait until the government reopens to try it out.😦

[UPDATE: As of 10/4/13 at 10am, Chronicling America appears to be up and working!]

Testudo and Travel Gnome

Testudo and Gnome _ final

 

Whether you travel to a beach, participate in a service event, or relax in your home town, send our mascot a postcard with a picture of your spring break vacation destination.

Address the postcard to Testudo with a short note about your vacation. Your postcard could be featured on our blog!

Address your postcard to:

Special Collections

Hornbake Library

University of Maryland

College Park, MD 20742

 Did you know? We hold tens of thousands of postcards in our collections. We’ll soon be the largest academic center for postcard research in the country.

The Chesapeake Bay: a spring break hot-spot

Staying in Maryland this spring break?

You’re in luck: there’s a lot of incredible history here. Did you know that you could follow in the footsteps of John Smith? Or that an island on the Bay started as a depository for sludge from the Baltimore Harbor and became a sanctuary for migratory birds? You can find sports history, shipbuilding, organic farms, and more–all within the Chesapeake Bay Watershed.

From the earliest days in history, the Chesapeake Bay has been recognized as a treasure. Go experience the Bay for yourself!

Be sure to send Testudo a postcard while you explore.

The first map to show and name the Chesapeake Bay, dated 1590 and named America pars, Virginia dicta.

Send Testudo a postcard over Spring Break!

Testudo loves postcards. Make his day: write a postcard to Testudo from your Spring Vacation!

 Testudo puts his postcards in the mailbox

Whether you travel to a beach, participate in a service event, or relax in your home town, send our mascot a postcard with a picture of your spring break vacation destination.

Address the postcard to Testudo with a short note about your vacation. Your postcard could be featured on our blog!

Address your postcard to:

Special Collections

Hornbake Library

University of Maryland

College Park, MD 20742

 Did you know? We hold tens of thousands of postcards in our collections. We’ll soon be the largest academic center for postcard research in the country.

William Morris Wayzegoose at Special Collections

Wayzegoose

Join the University of Maryland Libraries’ Special Collections for a night of revelry and merriment–William Morris style! Enjoy entertainment, food, and an exhibit featuring the works of this incredible artist. Click on the invitation to the left for details!