Yuletide Books: On display now in the Maryland Room

Yuletide Books From Special C

Get into the holiday spirit than by visiting the Special Collections Literature and Rare Books Collection in Hornbake Library! On display now in the Maryland Room are books written by celebrated authors about the holiday season or retelling classic tales. Visit the UMD Libraries hours website for our holiday hours – you definitely don’t want to miss this display!

The Night Before Christmas, Clement C. Moore Yuletide books by Alcott, Mencken, and HemingwayCharles Dickens: A Christmas Carol miniature bookDisplay Case

Books featured in the display include:

  • The Night Before Christmas, Clement C. Moore. Porter & Caotes: Philadelphia, 1883
  • A Christmas Story, Katherine Anne Porter. Mademoiselle: New York, 1958
  • The Cultivation of Christmas Trees, T.S. Eliot. Farrar, Straus and Cudahy: New York
  • Two Christmas Tales, Ernest Hemingway. The Hart Press: Berkeley, 1959
  • A Christmas Dream, Louisa May Alcott. Little, Brown & Co.: Boston. 1901
  • The Wood-Pile, Robert Frost. Spiral Press: New York, 1961
  • Christmas Verse. Oxford University Press: New York, 1945
  • The Untold Adventures of Santa Claus, Ogden Nash. Little, Brown & Co.: Boston, 1962
  • A Christmas Carol, Charles Dickens. G. Routledge: London, 1880
  • Old Christmas, Washington Irving. Judd and Dettweiler: Washington, 1934
  • Come Christmas: A selection of Christmas poetry, song, drama, and prose, Lesley Frost. Coward-McCann Inc.: New York, 1935

Featured Novelist from Special Collections: Gertrude Stein

Nanowrimo bannerNaNoWriMo – National Novel Writing Month – occurs annually every November. Each week this November, we wrote a post to celebrate the life of a novelist represented in the University of Maryland Special Collections. This is our last post for 2012, but we encourage any readers to continue their research of these fantastic writers–whether that research takes place in the Special Collections at Hornbake Library, or curled up on the couch with a cup of tea and a good novel, is entirely up to you!

This week’s novelist is Gertrude Stein (February 3, 1874 – July 27, 1946). Novels by this prolific author include Three Lives, The Making of Americans: Being a History of a Family’s Progress,
and The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas. Stein also wrote A Novel of Thank You, an exploration of the author’s process of writing a novel, and essay Composition as Explanation to explain the theory behind her writing.

Portrait of Gertrude Stein, with American flag as backdrop. 1935. Carl Van Vechten, photographer. Carl Van Vechten Collection, Library of Congress. (from Credo Reference)

About Gertrude Stein:
(From ArchivesUM and The Poetry Foundation)

  • Stein was born in Pennsylvania and lived in both California and Baltimore; however, her writing career began in Paris.
  • During Stein’s college years at Harvard Annex/Radcliffe College, she studied psychology under William James and published two research papers in the Harvard Psychological Review.
  • Stein had significant connections to the art world, and her home in Paris regularly hosted modernist writers and painters. Pablo Picasso is a frequent visitor and correspondent.
  • In The Collected Essays and Occasional Writings of Katherine Anne Porter, Porter describes Stein’s writing as  “a great spiral, a slow, ever-widening, unmeasured spiral unrolling itself horizontally. The people in this world appear to be motionless at every stage of their progress, each one is simultaneously being born, arriving at all ages and dying. You perceive that it is a world without mobility, everything takes place, has taken place, will take place; therefore nothing takes place, all at once.”

Resources about Gertrude Stein:

Papers of Gertrude Stein and Her Circle, Special Collections, Hornbake Library, UMD

First Appearances Collection, Special Collections, Hornbake Library, UMD

Caricatures of Mina Loy, Marsden Hartley, and Gertrude Stein, from the New York Tribune, November 4, 1923. From the Djuna Barnes Papers, Special Collections, Hornbake Library, UMD

Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas Papers. American Literature Collection, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University.

Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas Collection. American Literature Collection, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University.

 

Featured Novelist from Special Collections: Jack Hoffenberg

Nanowrimo bannerWriting: “the most fun you can have with your clothes on.” –Jack Hoffenberg

NaNoWriMo – National Novel Writing Month – occurs annually every November. Join us each week as we celebrate the life of a novelist represented in the University of Maryland Special Collections!

This week’s novelist is Jack Hoffenberg. A native of Baltimore, Maryland, Hoffenberg served in the military and worked as an advertising executive before relocating to California in the 1950’s and writing ten novels, including:

  • A Thunder at Dawn
  • Sow Not in Anger
  • Anvil of Passion
  • The Desperate Adversaries
  • 17 Ben Gurion
  • A Time for Pagans
reviews of the desperate adversaries

Reviews of the Desperate Adversaries. From the Jack Hoffenberg Papers at the Special Collections, University of Maryland.

About Jack Hoffenberg:
(from the Jack Hoffenberg Papers: Historical Note)

Hoffenberg spent ten months with the Los Angeles Sheriff’s Department, riding in patrol cars and working with homicide, narcotics, burglary, and vice crews, to gather information for The Desperate Adversaries.

He attended Baltimore City College, the University of Maryland, and the Maryland Institute College of Art.

He served three terms as president of the West Coast chapter of P.E.N. (Poets, Editors, and Novelists) International.

Hoffenberg was devoted to sports throughout his life–first as an athlete and then as a spectator. He took time from his arduous writing schedule to enjoy professional football and baseball games.

As a young man, he enlisted in the U. S. Marine Corps and served as an officer under General Frank A. Evans in the U. S. Constabulary in “Papa Doc” Duvalier’s Haiti for three and one-half years. A Thunder At Dawn is based on his military experiences in the Caribbean. He returned to military service during World War II, serving in the U. S. Army in Italy; at war’s end, he left the army as a major.

Hoffenberg’s award from P.E.N. From the Jack Hoffenberg Papers at the Special Collections, University of Maryland.

Resources:

Jack Hoffenberg Papers, Special Collections at University of Maryland Libraries
De drugmagnaten, translation of A Time for Pagans, Special Collections at University of Maryland Libraries

Featured Novelist from Special Collections: Hope Mirrlees

Nanowrimo banner

NaNoWriMo – National Novel Writing Month – occurs annually every November. Join us each week as we celebrate the life of a novelist represented in the University of Maryland Special Collections!

This week’s novelist is Hope Mirrlees. Her fiction includes  Madeleine: One of Love’s Jansenists, Lud-in-the-Mist, and Counterplot. Although printed copies of Mirrlees’s work are rare, Lud-in-the-Mist gained more recent popularity as a science fiction novel.

Learn more about Hope Mirrlees

Hope Mirrlees and Jane Harrison

Resources

Hope Mirrlees papers at UMD

Collected Poems, by Hope Mirrlees; ed. Sandeep Parmar.

‘The Lure of the Archive’: Dr Sandeep Parmar on the Archives of Hope Mirrlees and Mina Loy
The Carcanet Blog

Hope-in-the-mist : the extraordinary career and mysterious life of Hope Mirrlees
by Michael Swanwick (nearest copy available at Library of Congress)

Jane Harrison Collection: the Hope Mirrlees Papers
Newnham College Archives, Cambridge

T.S. Eliot Collection and Lady Ottoline Morrell papers at UMD

Neil Gaiman reccommends Hope Mirrlees’s Lud-in-the-Mist

William Morris: A Rebel of His Time

Sitting at the welcome desk in Hornbake Library puts me right in front of our exquisitely designed William Morris exhibit, which opened at the beginning of September. Aesthetic quality aside, I did not have the slightest clue as to who William Morris actually was. So I decided that the only reasonable decision would be to find out exactly who this guy was and how he contributed to society. I was pleasantly surprised to find out that William Morris was a rebel of his generation and in simpler terms, a pretty cool dude.

Morris was born in England in 1834 and raised in a wealthy family. He was a child who was incredibly spoiled by his parents who lavished him with extravagant gifts. Around the age of nine, he became the lucky recipient of a pony and a suit of armor. Morris, in addition to his fiscal wealth, was also very intelligent. He was reading novels at the age of four and attended Oxford at the age of nineteen. When he was seventeen, Morris began to receive a generous allowance of 900 £ a year from his family fortune, which equates to $114,000.00 in today’s money. To me and probably a lot of other people, it sounds like Morris was living the dream.

However, Morris was a remarkably independently principled individual who rejected the values of the Victorian class system. Growing up in the Victorian Era, Morris was a part of the upper class that was born into money. One could not acquire wealth through individual strengths such as intelligence, hardwork, and perseverance. A family legacy of wealth and success dating years and years back was the only route to a life of the utmost privilege. In an impressive demonstration of autonomy, Morris became an advocate for socialism, a far cry from the principles he had been exposed to throughout his youth. Morris wrote various books about socialism and was the founder of the Socialist League, which dealt with equality, workers’ rights, and anti-war movements. He also fraternized with other famous socialists who joined the Socialist League, such as Eleanor Marx, Karl Marx’s daughter. Without much success, Morris often tried to persuade his rich friends to join the socialist movement. Morris also participated in protests for the freedom to publish pro-socialism texts and was actually arrested on more than one occasion.

Morris often felt that he belonged in another time period, much like many young people of today wish they were born in the 1960s. He was fascinated with the medieval way of life. The art, labor, and writings of the Middle Ages influenced much of his fantasy literature. Morris is considered the father of the fantasy literary genre, and has been cited as a major influence upon fellow authors J.R.R. Tolkien and C.S. Lewis. So next time you crack open a Game of Thrones novel or decide to sit down for a Harry Potter marathon, thank William Morris.

If you need someone interesting to focus on for a class project (Morris was active in politics, literature, and architecture), come visit the William Morris exhibit! Hornbake Library also has poetry and books written by Morris. Or, if you have an awkward gap between classes and want something better to do than wander through cyberspace, come visit our exhibit. You won’t be disappointed.

For more information on William Morris, visit:
http://www.victorianweb.org/authors/morris/wmbio.html

For more information on Hornbake Library’s William Morris exhibit, visit:
http://www.lib.umd.edu/williammorris/index.html

Tracey G.

Testudo visits the Special Collections!

We were thrilled to have Testudo (the University of Maryland mascot) recently visit us in Special Collections! We had a lot of fun teaching him about researching primary sources, online finding tools at UMD, and the many collections available for research. He decided to create a Flickr photo-guide for using the Special Collections. Visit it at ter.ps/19h and let us know if it helps you too!

Picture of Testudo in the Special Collections