Exhibit: New Acquisitions in Special Collections

A new exhibit in the Maryland Room highlights recent acquisitions in Special Collections and University Archives!

Included in the display are historic postcards featuring various vacation and other unique tourist locations across the United States, dated from the 1900s -1940s.

Stop by and check out the souvenir folder postcards, which contain several postcards folded up so you didn’t have to send just one! All the postcards on display were donated to the National Trust Library Historic Postcard Collection.

The exhibit also highlights a recent donation of Arthur Rackham illustrations to the Literature & Rare Book collections. Arthur Rackham (1867-1939) was a celebrated illustrator whose work helped spark the Golden Age of Illustration from the 1880s – 1920s in Englad. Rackham is known for the whimsical and dream-like quality of his art. His work was often featured in fairy tales and children’s literature. In addition to several books, a framed illustration signed by Rackham is on display featuring a scene from the Compleat Angler, a popular book celebrating the joys of fishing.

Lastly, the exhibit features another, albeit much older, acquisition to the Literature & Rare Book collections in Special Collections and University Archives. A collection of illuminated manuscript leaves showcase the artistry of hand written and hand decorated medieval books. The leaves are dated between the mid-12th century – 16th century. They represent a variety of regions, including Italy, France, the Netherlands, England, and the Low Countries.

Visit the Maryland Room in Hornbake Library to explore these new treasures in Special Collections and University Archives!

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Recent Accession Highlight: The Joe Uehlein Papers

West Virginia steelworkers locked out of their factory.

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Famous musicians performing at labor benefit concerts.

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The impacts of law reform, globalization, and 9/11 on labor.

As the former secretary-treasurer of the AFL-CIO’s Industrial Union Department and the former director of the AFL-CIO Center for Strategic Campaigns, Joe Uehlein saw it all. And researchers will soon be able to experience these events from Uehlein’s perspective now that his papers are part of the Labor Collection. Continue reading

The Illustrated Wartime Correspondence of Hendrik Willem van Loon

One of my favorite duties as a graduate assistant is working the reference desk in the Maryland Room. Having only been a part of Special Collections and University Archives for less than a year, there are still a number of collections I haven’t seen, and helping others with their research is one way that I get to learn more about our holdings. Recently, a researcher introduced me to the illustrated letters of Hendrik Willem van Loon in the Helen Sioussat papers. I was delighted by the brightly colored, whimsical illustrations van Loon drew on the envelopes he sent Sioussat, and seeing them inspired me to learn more about the two friends, both of whom were compelling historical figures I knew little about.

Illustration of a whale on an envelope by Hendrik Willem van Loon, sent via airmail to Helen Sioussat in Nassau, Bahamas

Envelope from a letter from Hendrik Willem van Loon to Helen Sioussat, February 24, 1941

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Processing the Papers of a Maryland Environmentalist, Merilyn B. Reeves

In June 2016, Merilyn B. Reeves donated a collection of personal papers and publications to the University of Maryland’s Special Collections.  Reeves was a prominent member of the environmental movement in Maryland through her involvement in the League of Women Voters. She was Vice President of the League of Women Voters of Maryland and a member of the national board, where she was in charge of the Natural Resources Portfolio. Additionally, she was President of the American? Lung Association of Maryland and on the national-level board of the American Lung Association.  She tackled environmental issues such as the clean-up of the Chesapeake Bay and the Patuxent River and the defense of the Clean Air and Safe Water Acts before Congress, where she testified on several occasions. More locally, Reeves was a member of the West Laurel Civic Association and she acted as a tour guide for the Piscataway Wastewater Treatment and Patuxent River Water Filtration plants.

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Merilyn B. Reeves asking a question to Secretary of State Cyrus Vance at the League of Women Voters National Convention, May 1978

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The Labor Movement and Posters: Promoting Human Rights, Part 2

This is the last post in a series of blogs by the Labor Collections Team highlighting the amazing posters on display in the Hornbake Library Gallery exhibit, “For Liberty, Justice, and Equality: Unions Making History in America.” These posters encompass a wide range of human rights issues supported by the labor movement. There are nine different human rights issues that are covered in the exhibit. In Part 1 of this series, we showcased the posters in the African-American Rights, Women’s Rights, the Eight-Hour Day, and A Living Wage sections of the exhibit. This post will explore the posters in the Religious Freedom, International Workers, the Environment, and LGBTQ Rights sections, and several other posters included in the exhibit from the AFL-CIO collections.

Religious Freedom:

FabricofOurLives

This poster of a mosaic mural at the Bernard Horwich Community Center in Chicago, IL was produced by the Jewish Labor Committee. The Committee was founded in the 1930s to unite the labor movement and the American Jewish community in opposition to the rise of fascism. AFL-CIO Posters, Broadsides, and Art Collection.

 

 

 

 

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The Labor Movement and Posters: Promoting Human Rights, Part 1

In this series of blogs the Labor Collections Team would like to highlight the amazing posters on display in the Hornbake Library Gallery exhibit “For Liberty, Justice, and Equality: Unions Making History in America.” These posters encompass a wide range of human rights issues supported by the labor movement. There are nine different human right issues that are covered in the exhibit.  For this post we will be showcasing the posters within the African-American Rights, Women’s Rights, the Eight-Hour Day, and A Living Wage sections of the exhibit.

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Mourn for the Dead, Fight for the Living: May Day Becomes International Workers’ Day

Happy International Workers’ Day! To celebrate, the Labor History Collections has put together a small exhibit in the Maryland Reading Room inside Hornbake Library to tell the story of how May Day became International Workers’ Day and its link to Labor Day.

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AFL-CIO poster promoting International Workers’ Day also known as May Day 2017. You can also check out this poster in Spanish on the “What’s Next?” panel in the Labor History Collection exhibit!

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