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Women’s History Month: Navigating Women’s History at Hornbake

March is Women’s History Month, and for researchers and scholars looking for primary source material on Women’s History, Hornbake Library contains a wealth of information. Special Collections and University Archives (SCUA) has a particularly strong focus on nineteenth-century women, women in the 1970s, women in Maryland politics, women in athletics (university and nationwide), and women in broadcasting.

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Liz Novara, Curator for Historical Manuscripts at SCUA, has recently made available a new LibGuide on Women’s Studies. The LibGuide is a valuable resource to navigate the wide variety of primary and secondary source material available at Hornbake and allows researchers to navigate collections by distinguishing between primary and secondary sources, digitized material, subject areas, and relevant social media posts. Recently, SCUA also acquired a collection of political buttons illustrating key organizations and issues involved in women’s civil rights movements, such as Education, the Equal Rights Amendment, and the American Association for University Women.

Women buttons

This resource is in addition to two additional guides to women’s resources in SCUA: Women in Maryland and Women and the American Civil War. These LibGuides emphasize material available in the University of Maryland Libraries’ collection, but general Internet sources are also included. Hornbake library houses collections from the American Association of University Women, the League of Women Voters, and individual papers collections of Maryland women politicians. These collections are especially useful for researchers looking to focus on women’s political and civic activism in Maryland.

Links to LibGuides:

Women’s Studies 

Women in Maryland

Women and the American Civil War 

To find out more information about how SCUA’s collections can help you find out more about Women’s History, email us at AskHornbake@umd.edu.

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Labor Studies Symposium and Labor-related materials in the Prange Collection

Originally posted on Gordon W. Prange Collection:

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On March 5, the Center for the History of the New America at the University of Maryland will host a symposium entitled, “Organizing for Power and Workers’ Rights in the 21st Century.”  Symposium participants will be invited to visit Special Collections and University Archives (SCUA) at the University of Maryland to tour the George Meany Memorial AFL-CIO Archive and view a display of labor-related materials from the Prange Collection.  Acquired by SCUA in 2013, the AFL-CIO Archive includes over 40 million documents and is the largest single donation to the UMD Libraries.  The Archive complements the many labor-related holdings in SCUA.

The symposium will provide an opportunity to showcase a selection of labor materials in the Prange Collection, including materials on labor laws, labor practices, trade unionism, and labor education during the Occupation of Japan.  Below are examples of the types of materials that will be on…

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Media Studies Spring Talks in Hornbake Library

We are pleased to announce the Spring Media Studies Talks, hosted by UMD Libraries, Special Collections in Mass Media and Culture, in Partnership with Media Studies at Catholic University of America.

Join us on March 26 at 4:30pm for a talk by Ethan Plaut of Stanford University.

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About Dr. Burnett’s book project, Inventing the Auteur: Cinephilia and the Making of Robert Bresson

Assistant Professor Colin Burnett, PhD (University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2011), is writing a book, working title Inventing the Auteur: Cinephilia and the Making of Robert Bresson. This book answers a question that has thus far eluded scholars: what factors first made the auteur possible? It has long been believed that auteur cinema was invented when a small group of intrepid cinephiles began to form a canon of directors whose distinctive worldviews and consistent mise-en-scène styles reinvented cinema in a form of personal expression.

However, Inventing the Auteur argues that this well-worn notion simplifies the roles played by cinephile and auteur alike. In order to isolate the conditions in which the cinéma d’auteur thrives, one must appreciate the more complex reciprocal relationships that define intellectual film cultures. In postwar France, independent-minded directors and the sub-communities of viewers that support their works began to align around a shared lexical and conceptual field—a common intellectual and linguistic disposition—that promoted a set of paradigmatic assumptions about the central challenges of the medium and its social role and aesthetic properties and that encouraged the formation of new institutions, viewing practices and at times “sub-reflective” forms of reciprocal exchange.

At the origins of auteur cinema, then, lies a paradox: the rhetorical and conceptual frameworks that connect auteurs to their cultures act as an invisible hand that ensures that these filmmakers will be interpreted as visionary, personal or, as Jean Cocteau once stated of Bresson, “apart from this terrible trade.”

Burnett has just completed two articles, on the French filmmaker Roger Leenhardt and on Gilles Deleuze’s approach to the history of film style. He has co-edited, along with Dudley Andrew, a special issue of Post Script: Essays on Film and the Humanities devoted to the film and photography writings of Susan Sontag.

Contact us at askhornbake@umd.edu with any questions.

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Learning to research with Primary Sources

Has your class met with a librarian yet?

We are gearing up for a number of classes with students. We offer a variety of instructional opportunities, but our most common request is to provide students with an introduction to primary source research and the special collections available on campus. Use the resources below to refresh your memory or to learn about research with primary sources.

instructionResearch with primary sources

Web tools

Special Collections and University Archives (find materials now)

ArchivesUM  (archives and manuscripts on campus)

Digital Collections (digitized special collections materials)

Research using primary sources (tutorial)

Other tools

Primary Source Analysis

Newspapers to research topics in 1975

Introduction to Using Primary Sources on Campus (presentation slides)

Contact us – email askhornbake@umd.edu or call 301-405-9212

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Symposium: Organizing for Power and Workers’ Rights in the 21st Century

We are pleased to announce a symposium and introduction to our very special labor archives. See specific information about the symposium below:

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On March 5, 2015, the Center for the History of the New America at the University of Maryland will host a symposium exploring workers and organizing in the twenty-first century.  The symposium will be coordinated with the annual meeting of the Southern Labor Studies Association in Washington, D.C. on March 6-8, 2015.  In addition to the symposium, participants will be invited to view the George Meany Memorial AFL-CIO Archive, a prestigious archive recently added to Special Collections in Labor History & Workplace studies at the University of Maryland Libraries, and unique labor materials from the Gordon W. Prange Collection.  For more information about speakers and topics visit: http://newamerica.umd.edu/conferences/spring2015.php

Organizing for Power and Workers’ Rights Flyer March 2015

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New Exhibit: Highlights from the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners Archives

Do you work an eight-hour day? Get paid overtime? Have a safe workplace?

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You have unions to thank for all of those, and many other, changes to labor law. The University of Maryland is the official repository of one of the most influential labor unions in United States history, the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners (UBCJA).

Visit the Maryland Room in Hornbake Library to see a display of some interesting materials from the collection.

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The exhibit highlights union activities and important moments of union history, including photographs of the influential 1963 Reesor Siding strike, which became one of the bloodiest labor conflicts in Canadian history. You can also see Carpenters marching in 1947 with spears and shields to protest the anti-union Taft-Hartley Act.

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Photographs in the exhibit featuring the Reesor Siding Strike and the Taft-Hartley Act Protest

Not everything the Brotherhood did was so militant, however. President Dwight Eisenhower was the guest of honor at their 75th anniversary party in 1956, where he lit the candles on a cake adorned with tiny hammers and saws. The union also held conventions where its members discussed union goals and policies. And, when union carpenters were too old to work anymore, the union cared for them in their old age at the Carpenters Home in Lakeland, Florida.

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Ribbons on display worn at various conventions

To learn more about the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners and the role it has played in American history since 1881, stop by the exhibit. Then use the collection to further your research about the union’s efforts toward anti-Communism, an eight-hour workday, open shops and many other issues. Learn about the various professions of the members of the UBCJA, from carpenters, house-framers and lumberjacks to furniture makers, wharf builders and pile drivers.

All of the 700 linear feet of UBCJA correspondence, meeting minutes, official union publications, photographs, blueprints and film recordings are available for your perusal in the Maryland Room. These materials are currently being processed, with the support of the UBCJA, in order to make them more accessible to researchers.

Contact a curator to find out more!

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New Exhibit: Recent Acquisitions to the Association for Childhood Education International Archives

Stop by the Maryland Room in Hornbake Library and take a look at some of the new items on display!

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The Association for Childhood Education International (ACEI) exhibit is sure to recall fond childhood memories, from books like The Tale of Peter Rabbit, dolls from around the world, and all kinds of puzzles and toys. The highlight is every young girl’s dream – a 19th century doll’s trunk, complete with a collection of handmade clothes and accessories. But be careful what you say in front of the wax doll from 1885 – she’s enduring, and maybe a little frightening in the dark!

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But the ACEI archives has even more to offer than cursed dolls and lost childhood dreams. The Association for Childhood Education International was founded in 1892 to promote early childhood education and its collection includes a variety of potential resources for research. Whether you’re looking at the history of common issues in education such as classroom diversity, multicultural education, social development, or the role of technology in education, you will find a varied collection of books, archival material, journals and publications, audiovisual tapes, recordings and cassettes, as well as a wide array of memorabilia like the ones on display.

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On your quest to demystify the virtues and struggles of childhood, you might listen to recorded speeches by the well-known critic Neil Postman, read out-of-print children’s books, research articles and publications on popular issues in education, admire dolls and toys from all over the world, or tune in to Macaroni at Midnight. You’ll find it all available for research in the Maryland Room.

Take a look at the ACEI archives finding aid to explore the collection, or contact a curator to find out more!

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