The Mouse’s Tale

What better way to celebrate National Poetry Day then with the ‘Mouse’s Tale’ by Lewis Carroll! The Mouse tells Alice and the other caucus race creatures his “long and sad tale” in chapter 3 – A Caucus-Race and a Long Tale of Alice Adventures in Wonderland.

The Mouse’s tale is an example of concrete poetry,  printed so that the words form the shape of the mouse’s tail. It is a wonderful example of Carroll’s wit and humor. As the Mouse tells his tale, Alice imagines the ‘tale’ as his ‘tail’, giving readers a glimpse into her imaginative personality. Illustrators and typographers have continued Carroll’s tradition, resulting in new shapes and interpretations of Carroll’s creative poem.


I Spy a Mad Hatter!

Celebrate Mad Hatter Day!  Visit Hornbake Library to explore  all things Mad Hatter in our exhibit Alice 150 Years and Counting…The Legacy of Lewis Carroll: Selections from the Collection of August and Clare Imholtz.

From the classic John Tenniel illustration to modern advertisements, you’ll have a hard time picking your favorite. Can you spot them all?


Alice 150 Featured Object of the Month: October

“Alice 150 Years and Counting…The Legacy of Lewis Carroll: Selections from the Collection of August and Clare Imholtz,” an exhibit highlighting the timelessness of Alice in Wonderland and the life and work of Lewis Carroll (1832-1898), will showcase a new Alice related item every month.


In October, visit the Maryland Room Exhibit Gallery in Hornbake Library to view a humorous holograph letter written by Charles Dodgson (Lewis Carroll) to his friend Michael Ernest Sadler, Steward of Christ Church. Be sure to note the purple ink in which the letter is written (a trademark of Lewis Carroll), and enjoy the contents, which include a “little jar of Orange Marmalade,” which is in danger of being eaten if not picked up promptly.

View all the featured items of the month from Alice 150 Years and Counting…The Legacy of Lewis Carroll here.

Alice is Open!

#WaitingForAliceUMD no longer! It’s finally arrived!


Come celebrate the 150th anniversary of the publication of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland  with our exhibition: Alice 150 Years and Counting…The Legacy of Lewis Carroll: Selections from the Collection of August and Clare Imholtz.

The exhibit is open:

Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday:  10 a.m.- 5 p.m.

Wednesday: 10 a.m. – 8 p.m.

Sunday: 1 p.m. – 6 p.m.

More hours and directions available here.

Read more or follow us on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram @HornbakeLibrary #AliceUMD #Alice150 #Terps #AliceinWonderland


5 Curious Reasons to Visit Alice 150 – Opening October!

As we are putting the final touches on our exhibit opening this October, we wanted to show you a couple of our favorite reasons to visit! Come celebrate the 150th anniversary of the publication of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland  with our exhibition: Alice 150 Years and Counting…The Legacy of Lewis Carroll: Selections from the Collection of August and Clare Imholtz.


5. Did you know Lewis Carroll was a mathematician and logician? Here’s a game invented by Carroll called “Doublets”. The object is to transform one word into another in as few steps as possible, changing only one letter at a time. The first “puzzle” in the book is “Drive Pig into Sty.” Carroll says in the Preface that he invented the game on Christmas Day 1877 for two bored young ladies, who had begged him to send them some riddles. Having none at hand, he instead invented this game, which he originally called “Word-Links.”

Sewell34. Did you know Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland has been translated into over 170 languages? Here’s one of our favorites! Alitjinya ngura Tjukurtjarangka/ Alitji in the Dreamtime illustrated by Byron W. Sewell 1975, is a bilingual edition, with Alice translated into Pitjantjatjara and also adapted into Australian English. When this book was produced, the aboriginal Pitjantjatjara language had only recently been given a written form. Byron’s illustrations are brilliantly modeled on the mystical bark painting of the indigenous peoples of the Northern territory.


3. Did you know all the Queen needed was some chocolate EX-LAX? Come see all your favorite characters transformed in advertisements! Joan and Alice in Wonderland from 1933 features an Orphan Annie-like little girl named Joan who meets Alice in a dream in which she is threatened by the Queen of Hearts. She wakes up and tells her mother (who blames the Queen’s bad behavior on needing EX-LAX), that she just loves chocolate EX-LAX.

Andrea42. Among our many illustrated versions of Alice, we couldn’t help but notice that this caterpillar looks an awful lot like Jared Leto to us! What else will you find hidden in the illustrations? Les Aventures d’Alice au Pays des Merveilles illustrated 2006 by the Dutch-born neo-expressionist artist Pat Andrea, has created a polymorphous, somewhat eroticized, and often startling series of watercolor, colored pencil, and collage illustrations to Alice and her world of Wonderland. He has been called“a modern master of magical realism.” There is a muted realism to his Alice, always drawn in charcoal with a revealingly short skirt—no pinafore for this Alice.


1. What better place to start then at the very beginning! Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland published in 1866 by D. Appleton and Co. is known as the “Appleton Alice,” and is a first edition of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, second issue. The first 2,000 copies of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, printed in Oxford in the summer of 1865, were rejected by the illustrator, John Tenniel. As a result, Carroll ordered a new printing done in London. To recoup part of his financial loss, Carroll asked Macmillan, his London publisher, to sell the initial printed copies to the firm of D. Appleton in the U.S. The copies were then published with a new title page.

Read more or follow us on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram @HornbakeLibrary #WaitingForAliceUMD #AliceUMD #Alice150 #Terps #AliceinWonderland


Alice 150 Sneak Peek…

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Here’s a sneak peek at what you will find when you visit us starting this October in celebrating the 150th anniversary of the publication of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland  with our exhibition: Alice 150 Years and Counting…The Legacy of Lewis Carroll: Selections from the Collection of August and Clare Imholtz.

Read more or follow us on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram #WaitingForAliceUMD.

Barton/Veltrusky working in his Paris apartment, circa 1970s.

Archiving AFL-CIO

Spotlight on Paul Barton:

AFL-CIO European Representative, 1968-1994

By Chris Carter
University of Maryland iSchool graduate, May 2015

Creating a plan

As a part of my Master of Library Science degree, I worked at the AFL-CIO Archives for my field study course and worked on a semester-long project with the institution.  The collection I worked on was the unprocessed records of Paul Barton, the European Representative of the International Affairs Department of the AFL-CIO, to make them accessible to the public.  This collection is twelve linear feet of records created and accumulated by Barton between 1945 and 1992.  To make these records accessible we conducted a survey of the records, created a processing plan, and wrote the finding aid.

Understanding the subject

Barton/Veltrusky working in his Paris apartment, circa 1970s.

Barton/Veltrusky working in his Paris apartment, circa 1970s.

As a part of this process we conducted some research on Paul Barton to provide context for the records.  Paul Barton, whose real name was Jiri Veltrusky, was a Czech from Czechoslovakia born on June 5, 1919.  Barton who, as an intellectual in Prague received his PhD in the philosophy of aesthetics of semiotics with a special interest in theater, was a member of the Prague Circle, a group of intellectuals, as well as an advocate for free trade unions and democracy.  When the Communist Party of Czechoslovakia successfully launched a coup and took over the government in 1948, Barton, like other pro-democracy advocates, was forced to flee the country or face persecution, ultimately fleeing to Paris where he would live the remainder of his life.  In the early years of his exile Barton used several pseudonyms before settling on Paul Barton.  While in Paris he spent time writing articles and supporting the labor union movement, becoming a representative of the International Confederation of Free Trade Unions before joining the AFL-CIO around 1968.  Upon joining the AFL-CIO he served as the European Representative of the AFL-CIO International Affairs department, serving in the Paris office until his death on May 31, 1994.

Contextualizing the collection

Books authored by Barton

Books authored by Barton

Barton’s papers reflect the many communities the AFL-CIO worked with as the records are found in six languages, English, French, German, Russian, Czech and Spanish.   The topics in the records also demonstrate concerns held by Barton and the AFL-CIO, with topics ranging from trade unions in the USSR and developing countries and forced labor in the USSR.  The records also reflect the views of labor unions concerning such historical events like the Prague Spring in 1968 and the 1970 Polish Protests.

These records complement currently available collections in the AFL-CIO Archives, including the records of Jay Lovestone (2014-001-RG18-003), Irving Brown (2014-001-RG18-004), and the Country Files from the International Affairs Department (2014-001-RG18-001 and 2014-001-RG18-010).  The Thomas Kahn papers are also related, however they are not open to the public yet.  Note: Records dating after 1965 may be restricted.

Contact us if you have any questions or are interested in researching these collections.

Explore UMD’s labor collections, including the AFL-CIO archive.


New Exhibit: Achievements and Milestones in UMD Athletics

Have you ever been curious about the history of Midnight Madness? Have you heard talk of the women’s rifle team, which ruled women’s athletics in the 1920s and 1930s? Or perhaps you want to know just how big a size 18 basketball shoe really is.


Visitors to the Maryland Room in Hornbake Library now have the chance to learn more about university athletics through a special exhibit on display until September 18th. The exhibit features milestones in both men’s and women’s athletic competition at the University of Maryland and pairs interesting material objects with related photographs. For example, action photographs from a track meet in 1914, only three years after intercollegiate competitions in track and field began, sit in front of an original 1913 trophy from the Georgetown Relays.


One of the University Archives’ most fragile items can also be viewed here: a flag from the football team’s surprise victory over Michigan State in 1950. The team captured at least two flags from MSU and brought them back to Maryland. The flag in our collection includes signatures of the football team members, coaches, and staff, as well as university president Curley Byrd. Other football highlights include three helmets worn at different times in the 20th century, making obvious the drastic changes in helmet design and safety since the early 1900s.

IMAG1681Developments in women’s athletics feature prominently in the exhibit. For the first female students on campus, opportunities for recreation consisted of intramural competition in sports like tennis, basketball, and field hockey. In the 1920s, the women’s rifle team became the first to engage in competition with other schools. The teams did not travel, but rather transmitted scores via telegraph and exchanged their bullet-riddled paper targets through the mail! Since Title IX and the expansion of women’s varsity teams, many of UMD’s team have achieved national prominence – including women’s basketball, field hockey, and lacrosse.

The University Archives’ Athletics Collections contain much more than what’s highlighted in this exhibit. Documentation about the history of various sports on campus, in addition to statistics, programs, and media guides comprise the majority of the paper records. Many memorabilia items (such as t-shirts, bumper stickers, and gameday tickets), hundreds of trophies, thousands of photographs, and over 10,000 film reels and videotapes can also be found in the collections.


Most of the items on display are donations from university alumni or transfers from the Athletics Department. To find out more about these materials or other items in the collection, or to inquire about donating materials, please contact Athletics Archivist Amanda Hawk at

Upcoming exhibits: Fall 2015

Upcoming gallery exhibit:

Alice 150 Years and Counting…

Beginning this October, we join museums and libraries worldwide in celebrating the 150th anniversary of Lewis Carroll’s famous tale, Alice’s Adventures in WonderAlice Postcardland.

A result of over thirty-five years of collecting,  the work of August and Clare Imholtz not only preserves early treasures of Carrollian fiction, but celebrates the far-reaching influence of Carroll’s legacy by enabling a cross-cultural look at international illustration and Alice ephemera.

We hope you will join us as we explore the brilliant and complex life of Carroll the writer, teacher, photographer, mathematician, inventor, and friend.

Read more or follow us on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram #WaitingForAliceUMD.

Fall 2016/Spring 2017 Exhibit:

Frederick Douglass

Look for the Frederick Douglass exhibit, Joint Heritage at Wye House, coming to campus fall 2016.

As a child, Frederick Douglass lived as a slave at Wye House Plantation on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. Join us during the 2016/17 academic year, as we feature an exhibition of the objects related to the slaves and their owners, allowing us to explore the diverse experiences of those living at Wye House.