New Exhibit: Achievements and Milestones in UMD Athletics

Have you ever been curious about the history of Midnight Madness? Have you heard talk of the women’s rifle team, which ruled women’s athletics in the 1920s and 1930s? Or perhaps you want to know just how big a size 18 basketball shoe really is.


Visitors to the Maryland Room in Hornbake Library now have the chance to learn more about university athletics through a special exhibit on display until September 18th. The exhibit features milestones in both men’s and women’s athletic competition at the University of Maryland and pairs interesting material objects with related photographs. For example, action photographs from a track meet in 1914, only three years after intercollegiate competitions in track and field began, sit in front of an original 1913 trophy from the Georgetown Relays.


One of the University Archives’ most fragile items can also be viewed here: a flag from the football team’s surprise victory over Michigan State in 1950. The team captured at least two flags from MSU and brought them back to Maryland. The flag in our collection includes signatures of the football team members, coaches, and staff, as well as university president Curley Byrd. Other football highlights include three helmets worn at different times in the 20th century, making obvious the drastic changes in helmet design and safety since the early 1900s.

IMAG1681Developments in women’s athletics feature prominently in the exhibit. For the first female students on campus, opportunities for recreation consisted of intramural competition in sports like tennis, basketball, and field hockey. In the 1920s, the women’s rifle team became the first to engage in competition with other schools. The teams did not travel, but rather transmitted scores via telegraph and exchanged their bullet-riddled paper targets through the mail! Since Title IX and the expansion of women’s varsity teams, many of UMD’s team have achieved national prominence – including women’s basketball, field hockey, and lacrosse.

The University Archives’ Athletics Collections contain much more than what’s highlighted in this exhibit. Documentation about the history of various sports on campus, in addition to statistics, programs, and media guides comprise the majority of the paper records. Many memorabilia items (such as t-shirts, bumper stickers, and gameday tickets), hundreds of trophies, thousands of photographs, and over 10,000 film reels and videotapes can also be found in the collections.


Most of the items on display are donations from university alumni or transfers from the Athletics Department. To find out more about these materials or other items in the collection, or to inquire about donating materials, please contact Athletics Archivist Amanda Hawk at

Yuletide Books: On display now in the Maryland Room

Yuletide Books From Special C

Get into the holiday spirit than by visiting the Special Collections Literature and Rare Books Collection in Hornbake Library! On display now in the Maryland Room are books written by celebrated authors about the holiday season or retelling classic tales. Visit the UMD Libraries hours website for our holiday hours – you definitely don’t want to miss this display!

The Night Before Christmas, Clement C. Moore Yuletide books by Alcott, Mencken, and HemingwayCharles Dickens: A Christmas Carol miniature bookDisplay Case

Books featured in the display include:

  • The Night Before Christmas, Clement C. Moore. Porter & Caotes: Philadelphia, 1883
  • A Christmas Story, Katherine Anne Porter. Mademoiselle: New York, 1958
  • The Cultivation of Christmas Trees, T.S. Eliot. Farrar, Straus and Cudahy: New York
  • Two Christmas Tales, Ernest Hemingway. The Hart Press: Berkeley, 1959
  • A Christmas Dream, Louisa May Alcott. Little, Brown & Co.: Boston. 1901
  • The Wood-Pile, Robert Frost. Spiral Press: New York, 1961
  • Christmas Verse. Oxford University Press: New York, 1945
  • The Untold Adventures of Santa Claus, Ogden Nash. Little, Brown & Co.: Boston, 1962
  • A Christmas Carol, Charles Dickens. G. Routledge: London, 1880
  • Old Christmas, Washington Irving. Judd and Dettweiler: Washington, 1934
  • Come Christmas: A selection of Christmas poetry, song, drama, and prose, Lesley Frost. Coward-McCann Inc.: New York, 1935


The last in a series of Ghostly Encounters: read the terrifying Terrapin Tales from the University Archives!

Originally posted on Terrapin Tales:

In honor of Halloween, we saved the spookiest story for last.  Take a look back at the previous weeks for more ghostly tales: week 1, week 2, week 3, and week 4.  We hope you have enjoyed our paranormal accounts over the last four weeks.  Make sure to stop by some of them tonight!

We finish our ghost tour at the Rossborough Inn, one of the best UMD sites to experience unexplained paranormal occurrences.  The Rossborough, built between 1804 and 1812, was named for its builder John Ross, a tavern keeper and local landowner, and was one of the original college buildings.  Many travelers and stagecoaches used the inn as a way-station to break their journey between Baltimore and Washington, because it was situated on the main route between the two cities.  The building has also served as the headquarters for the Agricultural Experiment Station, housing for…

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This post is part of a series of Ghostly Encounters shared by the University Archives; follow Terrapin Tales for some great UMD adventures!

Originally posted on Terrapin Tales:

Are you following our spooky posts about campus ghosts?  Creeped out yet by the spectral spirits of Morrill Hall and Marie Mount Hall?  Keep reading – the best is yet to come!

This week finds us at the McNamee Cemetery behind the Stadium Drive Garage.  Not many people know about this spot, which looks pretty innocuous to the innocent passerby. While there is no record or rumor of paranormal encounters occurring here, who knows what the McNamee family gets up to when there’s no one around?

The cemetery contains the remains of several members of the McNamee family, who sold this part of campus to the university in 1938.  We are pretty sure we know at least two of the people buried there.  One of the deceased was a child named Albert McNamee.  He was the son of Charles and Elizabeth McNamee. Albert was born in 1904 and unfortunately…

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Spooky Special Collections: Rare Books

They say a picture is worth a thousand words, so here are a few photos of the rare books featured in our latest Spooky Special Collections display. Visit the Maryland Room in Hornbake Library to see these incredible works up close.

Miniature book: Kriminal-geschichten, a German translation of short stories by Edgar Allen Poe

Miniature book: Kriminal-geschichten, a German translation of short stories by Edgar Allen Poe. How could something so tiny be so terrifying?!?

Praxis criminis persequendi, elegantibus aliquot figuris illustrata, by Jean Milles de Souvigny

Praxis criminis persequendi, elegantibus aliquot figuris illustrata, by Jean Milles de Souvigny. So glad I’m not these guys.

The Vampyre, by John William Polidori

The Vampyre, by John William Polidori. Before Team Edward and Team Jacob ever existed, this was “Twilight” in 1819.

Display of rare books

Rare books displayed in the Maryland Room. Visit the Spooky Special Collections display through 11/2/12.

You can read some of our books online! Visit The Vampyre and Edgar Allen Poe’s The Bells in WorldCat UMD.
Also see our growing list of haunted reads throughout the centuries.

Spooky Special Collections

Buffy the Vampire Slayer could show you a thing or two about primary source research.

Buffy could show you a thing or two about primary source research.

Libraries are often the focal points for the spooky, mythical, and gruesome. Special Collections are no different, and we’re celebrating the spirit of Halloween in style!

University Archives Blog:

“Ghostly Encounters” will feature haunted places at the University of Maryland. Visit their site every Wednesday, and be prepared to think of your classroom in a new, terrifying, way.

Spooky Special Collections Display:

Girls' Series Books from the Pagnani Collection

Girls’ Series Books from the Pagnani Collection

Celebrate Halloween with the Spooky Special Collections display in the Maryland Room of Hornbake Library!  Our current display hosts girls’ series books. Each of these books (from the Rose and Joseph Pagnani Collection) features a heroine forced to use her skill and resourcefulness to face the mysterious criminal unknown. Especially enticing are the colorful, suspenseful covers.

Come back next week for rare books from our collection with a decidedly grisly twist. The display runs through November 2nd.

Online Resources:

Visit the WorldCat UMD list of items featured in our Spooky Special Collections display, and a list for books about the state of Maryland’s haunted locations and local ghouls.