Sue Fryer Ward: An Advocate for Maryland’s Senior Citizens

The Sue Fryer Ward papers were recently donated to the University of Maryland’s Special Collections by Ward’s daughter, Lucille Ward Walker. They chronicle Ward’s activities as a licensed social worker and her political career at the county and state level. A first in a series of donations, this particular group of materials includes Sue Fryer Ward’s correspondence, news clippings, speeches, certificates and other awards, reports, and photographs.

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Photograph of Sue Fryer Ward with then-County Executive Parris Glendening, 1994. Note reads: “To Sue: With warmest congratulations. You have been a key to the progressive spirit of this county. Parris.” Sue Fryer Ward papers, Special Collections and University Archives, University of Maryland Libraries.

Ward was passionate about advocating for the rights of elders. As a child, she spent ten years living on a Navajo reservation while her father worked for the Bureau of Indian Affairs. She witnessed the respect that the Navajo tribe paid to their elders; this experience helped to inspire the work she did on behalf of senior citizens. Ward was the director of the Department of Aging for Prince George’s County from 1982 to1991. During this time, she worked closely with then-County Executive Parris Glendening to improve health care, transportation, and housing options for elders. Ward was also the director of the County’s Department of Family Services from 1992 to 1995. By consolidating the Department of Aging with the Commission for Women, the Commission for Persons with Disabilities, the Commission for Children and Youth, and the Commission for Families, Ward and other officials were able to better serve those in need by combining their knowledge and resources. As governor of Maryland, Parris Glendening later named Ward the director of Maryland’s Office on Aging, a position that she held between 1995 and1998. This agency became a Cabinet-level department in 1998 and Ward was appointed the Secretary of Aging for the State of Maryland. She was the first person to hold this position.

After Ward left government service in 2003, she became the grassroots director for the National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare. In this role, she fought against cuts to Social Security and Medicare and led efforts to educate citizens across the nation about the importance of these programs. Ward retired from this position in 2011.

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Photograph of Sue Fryer Ward with a colleague at the National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare, ca. 2003. Sue Fryer Ward papers, Special Collections and University Archives, University of Maryland Libraries.

Sue Fryer Ward was also a candidate for the House of Representatives in 1978. She challenged Republican incumbent Marjorie Holt for the seat of Maryland’s Fourth District. During her campaign, she focused on employment, inflation, energy, and the improvement of services like day care, education, and housing. The Sue Fryer Ward papers include news clippings, campaign buttons, stickers, an election guide, and correspondence which relate to this ultimately unsuccessful congressional campaign.

Throughout her life, Ward remained politically active. She helped to staff polls on Election Day and participated in various political demonstrations. Ward received the 1994 Gladys Noon Spellman Award for Excellence in Public Service for her service to the Prince George’s County government. She also received a 2001 Kathleen Kennedy Townsend Award of Excellence to Outstanding Women in Government Service. The Maryland chapter of the National Association of Social Workers selected Ward as the Social Worker of the Year in 2003. She was also posthumously inducted into the Maryland Women’s Hall of Fame in 2015. Many of the certificates and plaques that Ward earned throughout her career are included in this group of materials.

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Campaign buttons. Sue Fryer Ward papers, Special Collections and University Archives, University of Maryland Libraries.

Among its several collection strengths, the Maryland and Historical Collections unit strives to document the activities of Maryland women in politics through active collecting. Researchers can learn more about similar resources by consulting the Women’s Political Papers section of the Women in Maryland LibGuide. The Sue Fryer Ward papers join the papers of Lucille Maurer, Carol S. Petzold, and Pauline Menes,  now available to researchers in the Maryland Room of Hornbake Library. This collection would be helpful for researchers particularly interested in Maryland women in politics and in advocacy for senior citizens.


Emily Flint is a first year MLIS student in the College of Information Studies at the University of Maryland. She works in the State of Maryland and Historical Collections at UMD’s Special Collections and University Archives.

Is History on Repeat? More Cartoons from John Stampone

The idea that history repeats itself is a popular concept. Whether expressed as “those who do not learn history are doomed to repeat it” or “there’s nothing new under the sun,” this concept has found countless different expressions for itself. While it may be a cliche, it is a very real part of working in an archive. The collection could be from 10, 50, or 100 years ago, and I still find myself surprised by how resonant the materials can be with the present. The cartoons of John Stampone is one such case.

Stampone, a Maryland native having lived in Baltimore, Silver Spring, and Olney, drew cartoons that explored foundational concepts of America and the American labor movement (as has been previously discussed with regards to his Thanksgiving cartoons) as well as exploring the critical issues of his day. While looking through his work, I was struck by how some of the images and critiques he makes seem more relevant than ever in 2017.

One such image is a cartoon for the AFL-CIO News celebrating Labor Day in 1978. The cartoon depicts, in the foreground, a hand engraved with the words “U.S. Labor Day.” The hand is holding a radiant gemstone with the words “Human rights” emanating from it. This hand is juxtaposed against an image of the Kremlin the background out of which a hand rises clutching a ball and chain inscribed with “oppression” on it. The stark binary between the darkened Kremlin and the brilliant gem of human rights really speaks to the growing tensions from the 2016 Presidential Election.

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The second cartoon that stood out for me is from 1975, also from the AFL-CIO News. It depicts a man, labeled “deepening recession,” hiding around a corner with a club labeled “social, racial tensions” as a pain of men one labeled “human rights” and the other “human relations” begin to turn the corner. The cartoon argues that human rights and relations are threatened by a recession that creates conflicts between classes and races. Coming out of our most recent recession and the political events that have followed, perhaps reaching its climax with the 2016 election, this cartoon remains relevant speaking to our current economic, social, and racial conflicts, almost 50 years later.

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The AFL-CIO News is fully digitized online – check it out!

Benjamin Bradley is a second year MLIS student in the College of Information Studies at the University of Maryland. He works in the Labor Collections at UMD’s Special Collections and University Archives. You can also find him over in McKeldin Library where he is the GA for Electronic Resources.

Speaking Abilities: Vice President Agnew, Spanish Speakers, and Foreign Born Americans in 1970

The Vice Presidential papers of Spiro T. Agnew contains a transcript of a press conference which took place in the White House on July 7, 1970. Agnew reportedly said,

“It is one of the disabilities of our culture as Americans that we don’t have more attention paid to the need of our citizens to speak the language of our contiguous neighbors. There are very few Americans, I think, that are fluent in Spanish, along with the 2,000-mile border that separates us from Mexico.”

Agnew – a lifelong member of the Republican Party – accepted that speaking Spanish (even as a primary language) was not a disqualification for citizenship in the United States and he addressed the situation of “Spanish-speaking citizens” as a set of linked social “problems.” Seeing himself as “a minority citizen” by virtue of his father’s Greek ancestry, Agnew spoke of the acceptable arousal of the “public conscience” by “members of minority groups” to “use demonstrative measures to trigger the public interest.” (1)

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During an official state visit to Greece in October 1971, Vice-President Agnew dedicated a plaque in Gargalionai, the hometown of his father, who immigrated to the United States in 1897. Official White House Photograph, Spiro T. Agnew Papers, Special Collections, University of Maryland Libraries.

Continue reading

50 YEARS AGO:  Maryland Responds to Floods in Italy

Special Collections and University Archives at the University of Maryland Libraries is home to political collections such as the Spiro T. Agnew papers, the Theodore R. McKeldin papers, the Daniel Brewster papers, and the Hervey Machen papers, which contain information and interesting perspectives on local, national, and international events. One such event documented in these four collections is the effort of Marylanders to assist in the relief of Italians flooded out of their homes fifty years ago this month. In early November 1966, much of north-central Italy was inundated by flood waters. As many as 300 people may have been killed, up to 50,000 farm animals were drowned, and countless shops and buildings destroyed (1). Refugees sought shelter in makeshift housing. The cities of Florence and Venice were especially hard hit. Devastatingly, the great concentration of art, architecture, and cultural heritage found in Florence was subjected to flood waters that reached 22 feet high in some places. The National Library of Florence was underwater. Astride the Arno River, the Ponte Vecchio, which dates back 2300 years to Roman times, had been badly damaged.

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The Baltimore News American collection includes photographs of the Italian floods of 1966. Special Collections, University of Maryland Libraries.

The response to the 1966 flood in Florence was decidedly international, as Americans Continue reading

Presidential Campaigns – Through the Candidates’ Eyes

Think the current presidential election campaign has been unusual?  The new exhibit in the Maryland Room of Hornbake Library explores some of the strange techniques that presidential candidates have used to appeal to voters across much of American history. Candidates (or their spokespeople) have spread serious ideas and spurious notions; built interest from specific demographics of people; sought the support of parties and coalitions of parties; and deployed advertising to increase public visibility and name recognition.

The documents and artifacts in this exhibit date from the 1830s to the 1980s, and are drawn from a variety of collections available for research in the Maryland Room. These include the Spiro T. Agnew papers, the James Bruce papers, the Joseph Tydings papers, the archives of the National Organization for Women (Maryland Chapter), the Rare Books collection, and the Marylandia collection.

Items of particular interest, perhaps, are the autograph letter signed by Senator John F. Kennedy after his nomination by the Democratic Party in 1960, and two official White House photographs, which separately depict Vice President Spiro T. Agnew and President Ronald Reagan. But, then again, there’s the 1932 poster for Franklin D. Roosevelt which promoted “Beer Instead of Taxes.”

Visit these and more in the Maryland Room through the end of October.

AFL-CIO Archives now available at UMD

The George Meany Memorial AFL-CIO Archive is the largest single donation to the University Libraries and complements other labor-related collections in our libraries. To find out more about related labor collections in Special Collections, please view Collections By Subject: Labor In America.

The AFL-CIO Archive consists of approximately 40 million documents and other material that will help researchers better understand pivotal social movements in this country, including those to gain rights for women, children and minorities.AFL-CIO boxes

The Current list of re-opened record groups from the George Meany Memorial AFL-CIO Archive:

RG1:      Office of the President

  • RG1-010              Office of the President.  Rosa Lee Guard Papers, 1904-1927
  • RG1-011              Office of the President.  Samuel Gompers’ Copy Books, 1907 1924
  • RG1-012              Office of the President.  Correspondence with Politicians, 1908‑1944
  • RG1-013              Office of the President.  Samuel Gompers and Woodrow Wilson
  • RG1-015              Office of the President.  William Green Papers, 1888, 1909 1952
  • RG1-019              Office of the President.  President’s Files, William Green, 1869-1955
  • RG1-023              Office of the President.  President’s Files, William Green, 1940‑1952
  • RG1-026              Office of the President.  George Meany Papers, 1935-1960
  • RG1-027              Office of the President.  President’s Files, George Meany, 1947-1960
  • RG1-028              Office of the President.  Merger Files, State and Local Central Bodies, 1955‑1962
  • RG1-038              Office of the President.  George Meany Files, 1940-1980
  • RG1-039              Office of the President.  AFL-CIO Joint Minimum Wage Committee, 1954-1960
  • RG1-040              Office of the President.  AFL Cornerstone Papers, 1881-1916
  • RG1-041              Office of the President.  Jurisdiction Books, 1890-1978

RG2:      Secretary-Treasurer’s Office

  • RG2-001              Secretary Treasurer’s Office.  Gabriel Edmonston Papers, 1881 1912
  • RG2-002              Secretary Treasurer’s Office.  Frank Morrison’s Letterbooks, 1904 1925
  • RG2-003              Secretary‑Treasurer’s Office.  Frank Morrison, 1911‑1914
  • RG2-006              Office of the Secretary‑Treasurer.  Secretary‑ Treasurer’s Files, George Meany, 1940‑1953
  • RG2-007              Office of the Secretary‑Treasurer.  Secretary‑ Treasurer’s Files:  William F. Schnitzler, 1952‑1980
  • RG2-009              Secretary‑Treasurer’s Office.  AFL Account Books, 1887‑1925
  • RG2-010              Secretary‑Treasurer’s Office.  AFL, AFL‑CIO Charter Books, 1891‑1966

AFL-CIO boxesRG4:      Executive Council

  • RG4-004              Executive Council.  Correspondence, Minutes, Vote Books, 1891 1954
  • RG4-005              Executive Council.  Samuel Gompers Memorial Committee, 1924‑1936
  • RG4-006              Executive Council.  AFL CIO Executive Council Minutes, 1955 1969
  • RG4-008              American Federation of Labor.  Executive Council Minutes, 1893-1955
  • RG4-009              Congress of Industrial Organization.  Executive Board.  Proceedings, 1942-1955

RG5:     Office of the General Council

  • RG5-001              Office of the General Council.  Lawyers Coordinating Committee Oral History Project

RG9:      Civil Rights Department

  • RG9-001              Civil Rights Department.  AFL Records, 1943 1955; CIO Committee to Abolish Discrimination, 1948 1950; AFL CIO Director’s Files, 1956 1967
  • RG9-002              Civil Rights Department.  Discrimination Case Files, 1947 1984

RG13:   Research Department

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  • RG13-001           Research Department.  Boris Shishkin Papers, 1918, 1927-1971
  • RG13‑002          Research Department.  Staff Files, Frank Fernbach, 1942 1968
  • RG13‑003          Research Department.  Staff Files, Nat Goldfinger, 1947‑1966
  • RG13‑004          CIO Research Department.  Staff Files, Everett Kassalow, 1947-1951
  • RG13 005            Research Department.  Director’s Files, Stanley H. Ruttenberg, 1946-1964
  • RG13‑006          Economic Research Department.  Office of Wage and Industrial Relations Records. Anne Draper Files, 1963‑1994
  • RG13-007           Research Department.  Convention Files, 1953

RG18:   International Affairs Department

  • RG18‑001          International Affairs Department.  Country Files, 1945‑1971
  • RG18‑002          CIO International Affairs Department.  Director’s Files, Michael Ross, 1945‑1955
  • RG18‑003          International Affairs Department.  Jay Lovestone Files, 1939 1974
  • RG18‑004          Affairs Department.  Irving Brown Files, 1943‑1989
  • RG18‑005          Affairs Department.  Staff Files:  George Delaney’s Files, 1921-1957
  • RG18‑007          International Affairs Department.  International Labor Organizations Activities, 1946-1985
  • RG18‑008          International Affairs Department.  AFL Advisors to the United Nations Economic and Social Council, 1944-1952
  • RG18‑009          International Affairs Department.  Staff Files:  Serafino Romualdi’s Files, 1945-1961
  • RG18‑010          International Affairs Department.  Country Files, 1969-1981.

RG20:  Information Department

  • RG20-001           Information Department.  Major News Publications of the CIO, AFL, and AFL-CIO, 1894-1996
  • RG20-002           Information Department.  CIO Union News Service, 1936-1950

RG95:   Private Donations

  • RG95-001           Morris S. Novik Papers, 1940 1989
  • RG95-002           Vanni Buscemi Montana Collection, 1925 1991
  • RG95-003           Virginia Tehas Oral Interview
  • RG95-004           Trades Union Congress Papers, 1942-1943
  • RG95-005           United Labor Policy Committee, 1950-1951
  • RG95-006           William Baillie Baird Papers, 1886-1927
  • RG95-007           Private Donations.  Lane Kirkland Papers, 1863-1998
  • RG95-008           Larry Rogin Papers, 1926-1988

RG96:   Still Images

  • RG96-001           Photographic Prints
  • RG96-003           Photographic Slides
  • RG96-004           Morris B. Schnapper Collection

The Revolution: French Pamphlets Illuminating the Past

Can’t get enough of French culture? Check out the French Pamphlets from the 1788-1804 Revolution, and the project that’s making them even more available to you.

Les Miserables movie poster

Click the image to visit the IMDB page for the 2012 movie Les Misérables.

Fiction provides an incredible lens through which readers can relate to events from the past. Hugh Jackman and Anne Hathaway’s performances in the 2012 hit Les Misérables brought the famous musical adaptation of Victor Hugo’s classic novel into pop culture. Some readers may imagine the French Revolution (which started over 40 years before Hugo’s student barricade) based on a popular high-school text: A Tale of Two Cities, by Charles Dickens. Stories like these touch the heart and provide a personal experience of history that high-school textbooks just can’t achieve.

However, primary source materials also provide insightful perspective from the point of view of people who experienced the era first-hand. Take the French Pamphlets, a collection of publications during the French Revolution (June 1788 – December 1804). Students and researchers from fields like sociology, linguistics, government and politics, even art and design, benefit from studying documents that everyday people shared then like Internet memes are shared today.

Now, a collaboration of departments at the University of Maryland are working from a collection of 12,000 French pamphlets to make them more accessible to students and researchers.

Learn more about the incredible project at this page.

Read about the grants and partnerships that allowed this project to happen.