Labor History Wikipedia Edit-a-thon

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Hornbake Library

Friday, May 1, 1:30 – 4:30 pm

Join a community interested in promoting labor history by editing the popular online encyclopedia Wikipedia. Part celebration and part workshop, Edit-a-Thons are organized around a single topic as a means to build awareness and community.  We’ll draw content from labor-related collections at the University of Maryland, including the recently acquired AFL-CIO Archives. No editing or technical experience necessary. All participants will receive complimentary issues of Labor’s Heritage journal. As part of a nationwide effort, other libraries with significant labor collections will also participate.

Event details: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Meetup/DC/UMDLabor

This event is followed by:

AFL-CIO Archive Reception & Tour, 4:30 – 6:00 pm

George Meany

George Meany

Join us for a unique opportunity to view the George Meany Memorial AFL-CIO Archive, a prestigious archive originally at the National Labor College. These rich archives provide a unique history of the labor struggle in the United States and internationally. See behind the scenes in the archives stacks: labor cartoons, buttons, pins, and memorabilia.  Civil Rights and Labor items will be on display in the Maryland Room. In addition, view labor-related materials, including photographs, censored newspaper articles, posters,  and magazines, from the Gordon W. Prange Collection, the largest archive in the world of Japanese print publications from the early years of the Allied Occupation of Japan, 1945-1949.

https://hornbakelibrary.wordpress.com/2015/03/30/civil-rights-and-labor-in-the-united-states-in-poland-and-in-south-africa/

https://prangecollection.wordpress.com/2015/02/22/labor-studies-related-materials/

Debut of "A Colony in Crisis"

Announcing “A Colony in Crisis”

A Colony in CrisisWe are happy to announce the debut of the Colony in Crisis website, where you will find a collection of digitized and translated French pamphlets dealing with the Saint-Domingue grain shortage of 1789. To facilitate access to each pamphlet, we have brought together the French original, a brief historical introduction, and a translation. While the subject matter will be of interest to those interested in a variety of fields such as Atlantic History, the Ancien Régime, and the Haitian Revolution, the primary goal of A Colony in Crisis is to get these fascinating and underutilized pamphlets into more hands and shed light on an interesting chapter in the history of Saint-Domingue. We expect it will be especially useful for undergraduate courses needing primary source materials that have been translated into English, but we welcome feedback as to the many other potential uses. Thank you to the Board of Advisors and the many colleagues who contributed; without their assistance the site would not be going live today!

The Early Printing Collection: An Introduction

Folio 28 recto

A page from the Cologne Chronicle, printed by Johannes Koelhoff the Younger in 1499.

A new (very old!) collection of early printing has now been processed and digitized, and is available in the Digital Collections or by request in person in the Maryland Room. The Early Printing Collection is a set of thirty-six leaves and pages that were printed in Europe in the late 15th century. It includes printed pages from many well-known works, including the The Nuremberg Chronicle, Historia Scholastica and The Cologne Chronicle.

Incunabula

Typographical printing done before 1501 in Europe is often called Incunabula, a funny pseudo-Latin phrase that refers to the birth of printing in the 15th century. The 15th century saw important advances in the movable type printing press thanks to Johannes Gutenberg’s printing press invented around 1450. The Gutenberg Bible is the first (and probably most famous) book printed using movable type, and while you won’t find any of its pages in the Early Printing Collection, the collection does feature many other pages from Bibles and other religious and historical chronicles printed around the same time period. Within the collection the printing itself is generally clear and easy to read — that is, if you understand Latin or Middle German!

Folio 1

A page of Genesis from Historia Scholastica is covered in paste marks

Early Printing History

Even though the leaves are over 500 years old, the collection is in relatively good condition and provides excellent examples of early printing history, from paper-making to moveable type setting to woodblock printing. Many of the leaves were printer’s proof sheets or scraps, but since paper was still a relatively valuable commodity at the time, these scrap pages were recycled and used in book-binding. They’ve since been removed from bindings, but many still bear marks from the old binding paste. Looking more closely at the leaves in the collection, you can find examples of mould-made papers with visible chain lines and laid lines that indicate how the paper was made by hand using a wire mesh screen. Watermarks, the designs and images found in laid paper, can also be seen on some of the leaves, especially those from the Nuremberg Chronicle. Most of the printing is done in a Gothic typeface, also called Blackletter, though there are a few examples of roman type as well. There are leaves from several important printers from the time period, including Günther Zainer from Augsburg, Konrad Dinckmut from Ulm, and Johann Koelhoff The Younger of Cologne. As for the context, most of the leaves are from religious texts like bibles, psalters, and books of hours, while a few of the leaves come from historical and legal texts.

Folio 21 verso

An unidentified fragment of a Missal is hand-initialed and rubricated in red ink.

Explore the Collection in the Classroom

The Early Printing Collection has many potential applications for undergraduate and graduate courses on campus. Courses in departments like English, History, Art History, Art Studio, Library Science, and others can utilize the collection to study firsthand the history of printing, typography design, and rare books. Plus, with thirty-six separate folios of leave, there are enough examples for students to work individually or in small groups to closely examine the details of the page and learn about early printing firsthand.

Figure 2

Agriculture, Illustrations and Prophecies

Figure 1

Figure 1

Hello everyone, it has been some time since the last post and there are lots of new things to report.  First off, I would like to introduce myself, Marie-Laure Flamer, as a “new” addition to the pamphlets team.  Since my start in October, I have examined over 1,000 pamphlets with diverse subjects such as opinions on King Louis XVI’s trial and judgment, satirical pieces and political poems, and far too many law decrees.

A little more about myself; I am a second semester senior studying environmental science and sustainability.  Though my academic background does not evoke a sense of relevance to the arts and humanities, my fluency in French and my familial ties to French culture and history fuel my interest in this project.  I take the project’s title, Revealing La Rèvolution, to heart given that reading these pamphlets excites the French patriot within me and transports me to the 18th century France.  What more could you ask for of a part-time job?

Figure 2

Figure 2

Last semester, I worked my way through endless pamphlets concerning royal decrees, biographies, and reports on judiciary proceedings; however, in the past few weeks I have stumbled upon a few documents revolving around agriculture that I found to be particularly interesting.

In a recent collection of these agriculture-related pamphlets, I found this one describing the cultivation of potatoes and suggestions for its culinary preparation (Figure 1).  Also included was an illustration of a moulin used to make potato flour, an important ingredient in breads and pastries of the time (Figure 2).

Figure 3

Figure 3

I would also like to share this beautiful stylized initial portraying King Louis XVI (Figure 3).  Now if I could only find a matching version of a stylized letter M, then I could make a cool personalized signature stamp with my initials!

On a different note, many of the pamphlets showcase the eloquence of the writing style of the period and demonstrate the power of written word.  One pamphlet “motto” that particularly struck me can be seen below, which says “The kings are ripe, it will not be long before they fall.”

Figure 4

Figure 4

Thanks to everyone checking back in and stay tuned for more updates!

Revealing La Revolution: The Environmental Scan & MARCedit, Part 1

As the interim Curator of Literature and Rare Books I am writing the Environmental Scan for the French Pamphlet Project. Two tools I have found very useful to help with this are MARCedit and Microsoft Excel (I sort of love spreadsheets). I became familiar with MARCedit over the summer as I attempted to gain intellectual control over my expanded collection responsibilities and learned a new (to me) feature of Microsoft Excel which has proved very useful for putting together this report. So I wanted to tell you a little about what I’ve learned.

After I was appointed interim Curator for Literature and Rare Books in May, I requested a report from Technical Services of all cataloged items in Rare Books and Special Collections. I already had a comfortable grasp of the literary manuscript collections but had not had an opportunity to really get to know the Rare Books and Special Collections volumes. In an effort to become better acquainted with these collections, I asked Technical Services to include several descriptive MARC fields (language and subject entries) for each item in Rare Books and Special Collections.

Rare Books and Special Collections Stacks

Rare Books and Special Collections Stacks

Rare Books and Special Collections Oversize Stacks

Rare Books and Special Collections Oversize Stacks

I was hoping that the final report would provide me a broad overview of the collection as well as the ability to examine the collection at a more granular level without having to go and browse the stacks. While I do love browsing the Rare Books stacks this just seemed a very inefficient way to get to know the collections. Additionally, Rare Books are fragile (sorry to state the obvious) and I don’t want to be pulling them of the shelves, flipping through them, and the re-shelving them to gather information about them that should be discernible from their catalog records.

Rare Books Shelf

Rare Books Shelf

Technical Services ran a standard report version of my request and offered me a MARC file with all Rare Book and Special Collections items complete MARC records if I wanted to create my own report using MARCedit. I accepted the challenge and a short guide to MARCedit.

MarcEditor

MARCeditor

After downloading and installing MARCedit, the first step to using MARCedit requires running the entire MARCfile through MARCbreaker to create a UTF-8 MARC file. By converting the file to a UTF-8 file the succeeding programs that this information is run through will recognize the special characters and diacritics. MARCbreaker will clean up and search for errors in MARC records while providing preliminary data about the entire file. This data let me know how many times each MARC field was used which helped me in figuring out what MARC fields I wanted MARCedit to provide in my report.

MARCbreaker

MARCbreaker

I then ran my new MARC UTF-8 file through MARCedit and checked the result of my report in Microsoft Excel. My report was a mess! Many of the records were missing information in the MARCfields I had requested and most of the records in foreign languages using special characters and diacritics came through garbled. The problems were not MARCedit or Excel’s they were mine. I realized that I was going to need to dig a little deeper into MARC fields and get crafty about how I imported my data into Excel.

I had a basic understanding of the MARC fields from one of my introductory iSchool courses but found it necessary to rely heavily on the Library of Congress’s MARC21 Bibliographic Data website to make sure that I was getting the MARC fields I truly wanted.* I had to run the report several times before I was able to figure out all of the MARC fields I wanted and how to request them from MARCedit.

Entering the fields I wanted into MARCedit was the hardest part. I could only select a single MARC field or field and subfield at a time when I knew I wanted about 20 fields in my report. So it was time consuming to select each one individually and see whether or not UMD Libraries was using that field the way I expected them to or not. The fields I finally ended up with in my report are:

008$35 – Language Code (letter 1)

008$36 – Language Code (letter 2)

008$37 – Language Code (letter 3)

* Did you know that for MARC’s three-letter-language-code each letter is entered individually into three separate subfields? Also, I had to enter each subfield individually so that each letter gets its own column in the spreadsheet!!!  Why catalogers? Why?

035 – OCLC #

050 – LOC Call Number

090 – Local Call Number

100 – Main Entry (Personal Name)

110 – Main Entry (Corporate Name)

240 – Uniform Title

245 – Title Statement

246 – Title Variation

260 – Publication

300 – Physical Description

362 – Dates of Publication

500 – General Note

510 – Citation & References

600 – Subject Entry – Personal Name

610 – Subject Entry – Corporate Name

611 – Subject Entry – Meeting Name

630 – Subject Entry – Uniform Title

648 – Subject Entry – Chronological Term

650 – Subject Entry – Topical Term

651 – Subject Entry – Geographic Name

653 – Index Term – Uncontrolled

655 – Index Term – Genre/Form

700 – Added Entry – Personal Name

740 – Added Entry – Uncontrolled Related Title

752 – Added Entry – Hierarchal Place Name

800 – Series Added Entry – Personal Name

830 – Series Added Entry – Uniform Title

852 – Location (Local)

856 – Electronic Location & Access

Having finally established all the MARC fields I needed. I returned to MARCedit to begin the process of exporting my final file. Under the “Tools” Menu I choose “Export Tab Delimited File” and set up a path to my new file, including the file name and .txt file type.

Exporting from MARCedit Step 1

Exporting from MARCedit Step 1

Next I entered each of the individual MARC fields I wanted for my report.

Exporting in MARCedit Step 2

Exporting from MARCedit Step 2

Once they were all entered I choose to export the file. I opened the text file just to check and make sure that it looked correct.

Exporting from MARCedit Step 3

Exporting from MARCedit Step 3

However I did not really want to keep my data as a .txt file. I wanted to be able to analyze the data and manipulate it in a table format. So I needed to import my .txt file into Microsoft Excel.

To be continued in Part 2… Revealing La Revolution: The Environmental Scan & Microsoft Excel, Part 2

*While I was working on this the government (including all Library of Congress webpages) was shut down. I had to use the Internet Archive’s Way Back Machine to retrieve the information I needed.

New Material Available from the AFL-CIO Collection

This week we’re re-opening 6 more sub-record groups and a small number of selected Labor History publications! See other available portions of the collection or contact us to plan your visit.

Newly opened portions of the collection

 RG4: Executive Council

RG4-010               Early Federation Records, 1881-1888

 RG18: International Affairs Department

RG18‑006            CIO International Affairs Department.  Director’s Files, Michael H.S. Ross, 1934‑1963

 RG20: Information Department

RG20-003             Information Department.  CIO, AFL-CIO Press Releases, 1937-1995

RG20-004             Information Department.  AFL-CIO News Cartoons, 1955-1984

 RG28: Organizing Department

RG28-001             Organization and Field Services Department.  AFL Federal Local Unions (FLUs); AFL-CIO Directly Affiliated Local Unions (DALUs), Charter Records, 1924-1981

RG28‑002            Organizing Department.  Records, 1955‑1975

 Labor History Publications:

AFL List of Affiliated Organizations: 1903-1931, 1940-1955

AFL-CIO List of Affiliated Organizations:  1956-1999, 2002-2003, 2005

Reports AFL 1881-1955

Proceedings of constitutional convention CIO 1938-1955

AFL CIO Proceedings 1955-2009

American Federationist 1894-1982

CIO Union News Service (1936-1937)

CIO News 1937-1955

AFL Weekly Newsletter – Vol. 2-12

AFL News Reporter 1951-1953

AFL News 1954-1955

AFL-CIO News 1955-1996

LLPE League Reporter 1949-1951

America at Work 1996-2002

Union Advocate, Vol. 1 (1887)

The George Meany Memorial AFL-CIO Archive at the University of Maryland

The George Meany Memorial AFL-CIO Archive at the University of Maryland

Edgar Allan Poe in Special Collections

This Halloween we are celebrating the acquisition of a first edition copy of Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Raven.” Here are illustrations from a few of the many Poe books we have in Special Collections. Visit the Maryland Room in Hornbake Library to see some of these and other spooky rare books!

Edgar Allan Poe. 'The complete works of Edgar Allan Poe' New York: Putnam, [c1902]

Edgar Allan Poe. ‘The complete works of Edgar Allan Poe’ New York: Putnam, [c1902]

"Bon-Bon," Edgar Allan Poe. 'The complete works of Edgar Allan Poe' New York: Putnam, [c1902]

“Bon-Bon,” Edgar Allan Poe. ‘The complete works of Edgar Allan Poe’ New York: Putnam, c1902. Illustration by T.S. Coburn.

'Metzengerstein' Edgar Allan Poe.  'Tales of Mystery & Imagination' With 16 aquatints by William Sharp. New York: Garamond Press, 1941.

‘Metzengerstein’ Edgar Allan Poe. ‘Tales of Mystery & Imagination’ With 16 aquatints by William Sharp. New York: Garamond Press, 1941.

Edgar Allan Poe. 'The works of Edgar Allan Poe' Frontispiece painting by Arthur E. Becher. New York, P. F. Collier, 1903

Edgar Allan Poe. ‘The works of Edgar Allan Poe’ Frontispiece painting by Arthur E. Becher. New York, P. F. Collier, 1903

Edgar Allan Poe. 'The Raven' Easthampton, Mass.: Cheloniidae Press, 1986.

Edgar Allan Poe. ‘The Raven’ Easthampton, Mass.: Cheloniidae Press, 1986.

Edgar Allan Poe. 'The Raven.' Illustrated by Gustave Doré. New York: Harper & Brothers, 1884.

Edgar Allan Poe. ‘The Raven.’ Illustrated by Gustave Doré. New York: Harper & Brothers, 1884.

'The Fall of the House of Usher' Edgar Allan Poe.  'Tales of Mystery & Imagination' With 16 aquatints by William Sharp. New York: Garamond Press, 1941.

‘The Fall of the House of Usher’ Edgar Allan Poe. ‘Tales of Mystery & Imagination’ With 16 aquatints by William Sharp. New York: Garamond Press, 1941.

To see more illustrations from these and other books, visit us on Flickr. And be sure to come to Halloween at Hornbake on Thursday, October 31!

AFL-CIO Archives now available at UMD

The George Meany Memorial AFL-CIO Archive is the largest single donation to the University Libraries and complements other labor-related collections in our libraries. To find out more about related labor collections in Special Collections, please view Collections By Subject: Labor In America.

The AFL-CIO Archive consists of approximately 40 million documents and other material that will help researchers better understand pivotal social movements in this country, including those to gain rights for women, children and minorities.AFL-CIO boxes

The Current list of re-opened record groups from the George Meany Memorial AFL-CIO Archive:

RG1:      Office of the President

  • RG1-010              Office of the President.  Rosa Lee Guard Papers, 1904-1927
  • RG1-011              Office of the President.  Samuel Gompers’ Copy Books, 1907 1924
  • RG1-012              Office of the President.  Correspondence with Politicians, 1908‑1944
  • RG1-013              Office of the President.  Samuel Gompers and Woodrow Wilson
  • RG1-015              Office of the President.  William Green Papers, 1888, 1909 1952
  • RG1-019              Office of the President.  President’s Files, William Green, 1869-1955
  • RG1-023              Office of the President.  President’s Files, William Green, 1940‑1952
  • RG1-026              Office of the President.  George Meany Papers, 1935-1960
  • RG1-027              Office of the President.  President’s Files, George Meany, 1947-1960
  • RG1-028              Office of the President.  Merger Files, State and Local Central Bodies, 1955‑1962
  • RG1-038              Office of the President.  George Meany Files, 1940-1980
  • RG1-039              Office of the President.  AFL-CIO Joint Minimum Wage Committee, 1954-1960
  • RG1-040              Office of the President.  AFL Cornerstone Papers, 1881-1916
  • RG1-041              Office of the President.  Jurisdiction Books, 1890-1978

RG2:      Secretary-Treasurer’s Office

  • RG2-001              Secretary Treasurer’s Office.  Gabriel Edmonston Papers, 1881 1912
  • RG2-002              Secretary Treasurer’s Office.  Frank Morrison’s Letterbooks, 1904 1925
  • RG2-003              Secretary‑Treasurer’s Office.  Frank Morrison, 1911‑1914
  • RG2-006              Office of the Secretary‑Treasurer.  Secretary‑ Treasurer’s Files, George Meany, 1940‑1953
  • RG2-007              Office of the Secretary‑Treasurer.  Secretary‑ Treasurer’s Files:  William F. Schnitzler, 1952‑1980
  • RG2-009              Secretary‑Treasurer’s Office.  AFL Account Books, 1887‑1925
  • RG2-010              Secretary‑Treasurer’s Office.  AFL, AFL‑CIO Charter Books, 1891‑1966

AFL-CIO boxesRG4:      Executive Council

  • RG4-004              Executive Council.  Correspondence, Minutes, Vote Books, 1891 1954
  • RG4-005              Executive Council.  Samuel Gompers Memorial Committee, 1924‑1936
  • RG4-006              Executive Council.  AFL CIO Executive Council Minutes, 1955 1969
  • RG4-008              American Federation of Labor.  Executive Council Minutes, 1893-1955
  • RG4-009              Congress of Industrial Organization.  Executive Board.  Proceedings, 1942-1955

RG5:     Office of the General Council

  • RG5-001              Office of the General Council.  Lawyers Coordinating Committee Oral History Project

RG9:      Civil Rights Department

  • RG9-001              Civil Rights Department.  AFL Records, 1943 1955; CIO Committee to Abolish Discrimination, 1948 1950; AFL CIO Director’s Files, 1956 1967
  • RG9-002              Civil Rights Department.  Discrimination Case Files, 1947 1984

RG13:   Research Department

George Meany

George Meany

  • RG13-001           Research Department.  Boris Shishkin Papers, 1918, 1927-1971
  • RG13‑002          Research Department.  Staff Files, Frank Fernbach, 1942 1968
  • RG13‑003          Research Department.  Staff Files, Nat Goldfinger, 1947‑1966
  • RG13‑004          CIO Research Department.  Staff Files, Everett Kassalow, 1947-1951
  • RG13 005            Research Department.  Director’s Files, Stanley H. Ruttenberg, 1946-1964
  • RG13‑006          Economic Research Department.  Office of Wage and Industrial Relations Records. Anne Draper Files, 1963‑1994
  • RG13-007           Research Department.  Convention Files, 1953

RG18:   International Affairs Department

  • RG18‑001          International Affairs Department.  Country Files, 1945‑1971
  • RG18‑002          CIO International Affairs Department.  Director’s Files, Michael Ross, 1945‑1955
  • RG18‑003          International Affairs Department.  Jay Lovestone Files, 1939 1974
  • RG18‑004          Affairs Department.  Irving Brown Files, 1943‑1989
  • RG18‑005          Affairs Department.  Staff Files:  George Delaney’s Files, 1921-1957
  • RG18‑007          International Affairs Department.  International Labor Organizations Activities, 1946-1985
  • RG18‑008          International Affairs Department.  AFL Advisors to the United Nations Economic and Social Council, 1944-1952
  • RG18‑009          International Affairs Department.  Staff Files:  Serafino Romualdi’s Files, 1945-1961
  • RG18‑010          International Affairs Department.  Country Files, 1969-1981.

RG20:  Information Department

  • RG20-001           Information Department.  Major News Publications of the CIO, AFL, and AFL-CIO, 1894-1996
  • RG20-002           Information Department.  CIO Union News Service, 1936-1950

RG95:   Private Donations

  • RG95-001           Morris S. Novik Papers, 1940 1989
  • RG95-002           Vanni Buscemi Montana Collection, 1925 1991
  • RG95-003           Virginia Tehas Oral Interview
  • RG95-004           Trades Union Congress Papers, 1942-1943
  • RG95-005           United Labor Policy Committee, 1950-1951
  • RG95-006           William Baillie Baird Papers, 1886-1927
  • RG95-007           Private Donations.  Lane Kirkland Papers, 1863-1998
  • RG95-008           Larry Rogin Papers, 1926-1988

RG96:   Still Images

  • RG96-001           Photographic Prints
  • RG96-003           Photographic Slides
  • RG96-004           Morris B. Schnapper Collection

Yuletide Books: On display now in the Maryland Room

Yuletide Books From Special C

Get into the holiday spirit than by visiting the Special Collections Literature and Rare Books Collection in Hornbake Library! On display now in the Maryland Room are books written by celebrated authors about the holiday season or retelling classic tales. Visit the UMD Libraries hours website for our holiday hours – you definitely don’t want to miss this display!

The Night Before Christmas, Clement C. Moore Yuletide books by Alcott, Mencken, and HemingwayCharles Dickens: A Christmas Carol miniature bookDisplay Case

Books featured in the display include:

  • The Night Before Christmas, Clement C. Moore. Porter & Caotes: Philadelphia, 1883
  • A Christmas Story, Katherine Anne Porter. Mademoiselle: New York, 1958
  • The Cultivation of Christmas Trees, T.S. Eliot. Farrar, Straus and Cudahy: New York
  • Two Christmas Tales, Ernest Hemingway. The Hart Press: Berkeley, 1959
  • A Christmas Dream, Louisa May Alcott. Little, Brown & Co.: Boston. 1901
  • The Wood-Pile, Robert Frost. Spiral Press: New York, 1961
  • Christmas Verse. Oxford University Press: New York, 1945
  • The Untold Adventures of Santa Claus, Ogden Nash. Little, Brown & Co.: Boston, 1962
  • A Christmas Carol, Charles Dickens. G. Routledge: London, 1880
  • Old Christmas, Washington Irving. Judd and Dettweiler: Washington, 1934
  • Come Christmas: A selection of Christmas poetry, song, drama, and prose, Lesley Frost. Coward-McCann Inc.: New York, 1935