Civil Rights and Worker Rights: Digitizing Labor Archives

Our collections are used by researchers in lots of different ways, learn more about this project focused on civil rights and workers rights.

Advertisements

Special Collections Students at Work: The Baltimore News American Photo Archives

The University of Maryland’s Special Collections & University Archives houses a particularly interesting and highly utilized acquisition in the Baltimore News American collection. Acquired 30 years ago when the News American stopped its presses for the last time, the collection contains subject and biographical photos used in the Baltimore News American family of newspapers from 1904 through 1986. The fully processed section of the collection spans close to 1600 boxes and over 660 linear feet. And that doesn’t even consider the oversize materials and extensive unprocessed boxes which bring the total number of images to possibly over 1.5 million. The numbers are certainly impressive, but you cannot get a scope for how big the collection is until you see entire walls in our archive stacks solely dedicated to the photographs.

BNAboxes_brightMaking this collection more accessible is the work of many hands, including volunteers and student employees. The work often begins by pulling a number of photos, organized in folders, from one of our unprocessed boxes. We collect information from both the folders and the images including the subject, first and last name, number of photos, and relevant dates [when the photographs were taken, or when the images were published in the newspaper]. All the while, the photos are moved into better, safer acid-free folders and boxes and entered into a database of processed images. Also, given the number of people who have processed this gargantuan collection, we take the time to proofread each other’s data entry work.

Continue reading

AFL-CIO Artifact Project: Summer 2016

By Margot Willis, Labor Collections Volunteer

In 2013, the American Federation of Labor – Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO) donated the entire holdings of the George Meany Memorial Archives to the Special Collections and University Archives Department of University of Maryland Libraries. This collection contains the most important documentation of the history of America’s largest federation of labor unions, founded in 1955. Comprising over 20,000 linear shelf feet of a wide variety material, including documents, photographs, audiovisual materials and artifacts, it represents the single largest donation of archival material to the University to date.

Until this summer, the artifacts portion of the AFL-CIO collection had gone almost entirely untouched by university archival staff due to other higher priorities.  Packed away in the same bubble wrap and cardboard boxes in which they were transferred to the University three years ago, the AFL-CIO artifacts sat in out-of-the-way corners of Hornbake Library.

Back in April, when I first spoke with University of Maryland Labor Archivists Jen Eidson and Ben Blake about a possible volunteer project over the summer, I mentioned that I have an interest in museum studies, and would like to learn more about the care and organization of artifacts in an archive. Because they needed immediate help in verifying identifications and locations of AFL-CIO artifacts in anticipation of an upcoming exhibit and due to the fact I was willing to work for free, they granted my wish and set me to work.

I worked wherever there were boxes, which happened to be in the very bottom and the very top floors of Hornbake library. Oftentimes, the spaces I worked in were very small, and the boxes very large.

Originally, the plan was for me to go through the boxes, locate each object in the original Meany Archives inventory of over 2500 records and enter the object’s new location in Hornbake. However, after about five minutes on the job, it became clear that the project would be a bit more complicated than that. There were items in the boxes that were not on the spreadsheet. There were items whose accession numbers appeared on the spreadsheet but whose descriptions did not match the items. There were boxes of dozens of items inside other boxes that had not been recorded as being there. The original inventory indicated that some boxes contained certain items, which, upon further examination, were not there at all. In other cases, boxes should have had only one object, but ended up containing six.

Continue reading

Social Media and Special Collections

While you were away this summer, we were busy considering what to do with our social media during the fall semester. We have a lot in store for you (the undergraduate students at UMD). You can follow us in a variety of ways.

Some specific projects include:

  • Roaming Testudo – Follow our school mascot as he visits our reading room to explore our collections and work through his class projects.
  • On this date – Discover fun facts as we connect our collections to specific historical events
  • I Found it in the Archives – Join the conversation by sharing your experience at Special Collections
  • Study tips – For acing your project using primary source materials

Or you can follow us on your favorite social media site!

  • Facebook -sharing study tips and interesting pieces of information
  • Twitter – providing information specifically for the students at UMD
  • Blog – leading discussions to help students learn more about research, especially using primary source material.
  • Flickr – sharing images from our exhibits and collections.
  • Pinterest – sharing images of items that inspire us.
  • Historypin – pinning images to interactive maps, within space and time

To see all the ways we contribute to the social media experience, visit our social media webpage.

If you have suggestions for future projects, please contact lcleary@umd.edu with your ideas.

 

Laura Cleary

Instruction & Outreach
Special Collections, Hornbake Library
University of Maryland Libraries
College Park, MD 20742
301-405-9988