Labor History Wikipedia Edit-a-thon

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Hornbake Library

Friday, May 1, 1:30 – 4:30 pm

Join a community interested in promoting labor history by editing the popular online encyclopedia Wikipedia. Part celebration and part workshop, Edit-a-Thons are organized around a single topic as a means to build awareness and community.  We’ll draw content from labor-related collections at the University of Maryland, including the recently acquired AFL-CIO Archives. No editing or technical experience necessary. All participants will receive complimentary issues of Labor’s Heritage journal. As part of a nationwide effort, other libraries with significant labor collections will also participate.

Event details: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Meetup/DC/UMDLabor

This event is followed by:

AFL-CIO Archive Reception & Tour, 4:30 – 6:00 pm

George Meany

George Meany

Join us for a unique opportunity to view the George Meany Memorial AFL-CIO Archive, a prestigious archive originally at the National Labor College. These rich archives provide a unique history of the labor struggle in the United States and internationally. See behind the scenes in the archives stacks: labor cartoons, buttons, pins, and memorabilia.  Civil Rights and Labor items will be on display in the Maryland Room. In addition, view labor-related materials, including photographs, censored newspaper articles, posters,  and magazines, from the Gordon W. Prange Collection, the largest archive in the world of Japanese print publications from the early years of the Allied Occupation of Japan, 1945-1949.

https://hornbakelibrary.wordpress.com/2015/03/30/civil-rights-and-labor-in-the-united-states-in-poland-and-in-south-africa/

https://prangecollection.wordpress.com/2015/02/22/labor-studies-related-materials/

World’s Fair Collection Now in Hornbake

An important collection has moved across campus and is now available at the Maryland Room, in Hornbake Library’s Special Collections. You can visit us anytime during our open hours to learn more about the history of the World’s Fair. If you want to take a look before you visit, you can browse the digital version of the collection. Below is a description of what can be found in this collection.

The World’s Fair Collection contains nearly 1,700 non-book items including photographs, stereographs, prints, illustrations, scrapbooks, sheet music, periodicals, maps, pamphlets, and memorabilia, as well as many artifacts, such as trade cards, tickets, exhibitor entry forms, postcards, menus, souvenir ribbons and scarves, and a stereograph viewer.

Represented fairs range from the 1851 London exhibition through the present, although the collection’s holdings are strongest for the 1876 Philadelphia Centennial exhibition, the 1893 Chicago Exposition, the U.S. fairs (as a whole), and Paris fairs (as a group).

The World’s Fair Collection also includes numerous books on international expositions. Its holdings are strongest for the fairs held in Paris (as a group), the Crystal Palace Exhibition in 1851, and the Chicago World Columbian Exposition of 1893.

Crystal Palace, North Transept, London 1851

Social Media and Special Collections

While you were away this summer, we were busy considering what to do with our social media during the fall semester. We have a lot in store for you (the undergraduate students at UMD). You can follow us in a variety of ways.

Some specific projects include:

  • Roaming Testudo – Follow our school mascot as he visits our reading room to explore our collections and work through his class projects.
  • On this date – Discover fun facts as we connect our collections to specific historical events
  • I Found it in the Archives – Join the conversation by sharing your experience at Special Collections
  • Study tips – For acing your project using primary source materials

Or you can follow us on your favorite social media site!

  • Facebook -sharing study tips and interesting pieces of information
  • Twitter – providing information specifically for the students at UMD
  • Blog – leading discussions to help students learn more about research, especially using primary source material.
  • Flickr – sharing images from our exhibits and collections.
  • Pinterest – sharing images of items that inspire us.
  • Historypin – pinning images to interactive maps, within space and time

To see all the ways we contribute to the social media experience, visit our social media webpage.

If you have suggestions for future projects, please contact lcleary@umd.edu with your ideas.

 

Laura Cleary

Instruction & Outreach
Special Collections, Hornbake Library
University of Maryland Libraries
College Park, MD 20742
301-405-9988