Did Led Zeppelin Play Here?: Public Record vs. Public Memory

Led Zeppelin Played Here, the most recent film by local filmmaker and UMD alumni Jeff Krulik, explores whether or not the iconic band added a last-minute gig at the Wheaton Youth Center to its tour schedule in January 1969—many in the alleged audience swear the concert took place, but no hard proof has ever confirmed it. Uncovering more questions than answers, Krulik’s film raises important issues regarding the reliability of public memory versus public record, mythmaking in popular music and the challenges of researching a local cultural event.

lzph-film-poster-image

On Monday, February 13, 2017, UMD Libraries will present a screening of the film, followed by a panel discussion and Q&A from 5:30-7:30 in the Gildenhorn Recital Hall at the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center. Panelists include Prof. Patrick Warfield (UMD School of Music), Prof. Joanna Love (University of Richmond), Dr. Jesse Johnston (College of Information Studies), Clare Lise Kelly (Montgomery County Planning Dept), and moderator John Kelly (Washington Post). A lobby reception will be held immediately afterwards.

Event is presented with support from the Performing Arts Library (PAL), Special Collections and University Archives (SCUA), the College of Information Studies (iSchool) and the Student Archivists of Maryland (SAM).

Underground Media Collections on Display in the Performing Arts Library

In honor of the exhibit “Heavy Metal Parking Lot: The 30-Year Journey of a Cult Film Sensation”, now on display in the Gallery of the Michelle Smith Performing Arts Library, Special Collections is highlighting the expansion of our materials related to local, DIY and underground media. In the latter half of the 20th century, the Maryland/D.C. area gave rise to a number of unique radio, film and music scenes that were largely documented through the DIY efforts of their participants, and the University of Maryland is playing an important role in preserving their histories. The photos, flyers, articles, fanzines, and sound and video recordings that survive in these collections show how local arts communities thrived through the creativity of the people they inspired.

Located across from the circulation desk in the Performing Arts Library, two large display cases showcase items from Special Collections and University Archives (SCUA) and Special Collections in the Performing Arts (SCPA). The SCUA case includes highlights from the WMUC Collection, and the recently acquired Jeff Krulik Collection, and the SCPA case includes highlights from the John Davis Photograph and Poster Collection, the D.C. Punk and Fanzine Collection, the Sharon Cheslow Punk Flyers Collection and the Jason Farrell Collection.

 

The World’s Fair Ephemeral and Graphic Material Collection

The World’s Fair Ephemeral and Graphic Material Collection is now available at the Maryland Room, 1st floor Hornbake Library. To celebrate, we are featuring four blog posts about World’s Fair history and the collection. Read the previous post here.

Part 3 of 4

Although the fairs are with us for just a short time and many of the fair grounds and their monumental buildings are no longer with us, the fairs have left behind an extensive amount of ephemera, photographs, periodicals, illustrations and pamphlets to make sure that the fairs are never forgotten.

The International Exhibition of 1862. London International Exhibition. Catalogs: color.

The International Exhibition of 1862. London International Exhibition. Catalogs: color.

The World’s Fair Ephemeral and Graphic Material Collection in Hornbake Library (UMD Libraries, College Park) contains items for close to 40 different fairs and international expositions.  The ephemera portion of the collection includes advertisements, letters, postcards, tickets, trade cards, menus, souvenir ribbons and scarves. The graphic materials portion includes illustrations, maps, newspaper clippings, pamphlets, periodicals, photographs, prints, sheet music, stereographs and a stereograph viewer.

Crystal Schottisch - composed by W. Byerly. New York Exhibition of the Industry of All Nations (1853-1854). [Altered digitally for contrast]

Crystal Schottisch – composed by W. Byerly. New York Exhibition of the Industry of All Nations (1853-1854). [Altered digitally for contrast]

La France a L'Amerique, La Liberte eclairant le Monde. Paris Universal Exposition of 1878. Bartholdi, Frédéric Auguste, 1834-1904. Badges: color.

La France a L’Amerique, La Liberte eclairant le Monde. Paris Universal Exposition of 1878. Bartholdi, Frédéric Auguste, 1834-1904. Badges: color.

Oorspronkelijk Nieux Cezelschapsel. Internationale Koloniale en Uitvoerhandel Tentoonstelling (1883 : Amsterdam, Netherlands). Game Cards: color.

Oorspronkelijk Nieux Cezelschapsel. Internationale Koloniale en Uitvoerhandel Tentoonstelling (1883 : Amsterdam, Netherlands). Game Cards: color.

Visit the recently expanded finding aid for the World’s Fair Ephemeral and Graphic Material Collection and A Treasury of World’s Fair Art & Architecture digital archive for more information.

Article by A. Moore, Historic Preservation Graduate Assistant.

In the papers of Bill Edwardsen . . .

Special Collections in Mass Media and Culture contains the papers of Bill Edwardsen. A first inventory of the papers recently revealed a wealth of photographs of pop culture figures.

Bill Edwardsen, a disc jockey who worked from 1949 into the new millennium, loved the music and entertainment of his heyday. He had a personal collection of over 6,000 records from big bands, 1950s crooners, and Broadway tunes. He attempted to play “his kind” of music for the rest of his career, and thanks to a later nostalgia movement, was rather successful in his quest.

Edwardsen refused to play rock. And country. And he didn’t like talk radio either. And he didn’t want to switch from records to tapes. This aversion to change caused him to twice leave a stable, popular post in search of a chance to play the kind of music he liked.

Edwardsen believed strongly that a disc jockey should get out of the studio to promote and improve his work. In addition to appearing at over a hundred local events per year at the height of his success, he traveled to conduct interviews with celebrities, pseudocelebrities, and anyone who might have something interesting to say. He kept a labeled collection of snapshots of himself with these figures. The photos date from the 1970s, during Edwardsen’s time at WQBK-AM, Albany. It is unclear where Edwardsen interviewed his guests, but the same sofa is visible in the Hope, Channing, and Rivers pictures. The pictures are somewhat bent with age.

Bob and Dolores Hope and unidentified dog

Cab Calloway

Carol Channing

Ed McMahon

Joan Rivers

Phyllis Diller

Post written by Ashley S. Behringer, Student Assistant