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Maryland Day 2016 in Special Collections

Special Collections and University Archives celebrated Maryland Day 2016 with crafting, coloring, croquet, and discovery! Among the activities we hosted in Hornbake Library were kid-friendly crafts like Color Your Own Terrapin, Color Characters from Alice in Wonderland, Perform Your Own Radio Advertisement, and Play a Game of Alice in Wonderland Croquet with flamingo mallets and hedgehogs- just like Alice!

Visitors also had an opportunity to discover more about Special Collections with activities highlighting our collections and exhibits. these included Meet the Real Testudo– the taxidermied terrapin who served as the model for the beloved statue located outside McKedlin Library, View Student Posters on UMD history, listen to the Alice in Wonderland audio book as they walked through out Alice 150 Years and Counting exhibit, and explore one of our newest collections- the Filipino American Community Archives.

Thanks to everyone who stopped by to make it a fun-filled day in Hornbake Library!

Alice 150 Featured Item of the Month: April

Alice 150 Years and Counting…The Legacy of Lewis Carroll: Selections from the Collection of August and Clare Imholtz, is an exhibit highlighting the timelessness of Alice in Wonderland and the life and work of Lewis Carroll (1832-1898). Each month, a new item from the exhibit will be showcased.

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In April, visit the Maryland Room Exhibit Gallery in Hornbake Library to view a humorous letter from Charles L. Dodgson (Lewis Carroll).

In the letter, Carroll declines an invitation to an “At Home” party. Be sure to note the purple ink in which the letter is written (a trademark of Lewis Carroll). Carroll made a point of avoiding “At Homes” in which hosts would designate a time for visiting—having said on another occasion, “I dread and shun all such hosts of strangers.”

View all the featured items of the month from Alice 150 Years and Counting…The Legacy of Lewis Carroll here.

The Lewis Carroll Society of North America is Coming to Hornbake!

RabbitLogoSmRA one-of-a-kind event is coming to Special Collections and University Archives and all are invited to attend! The Lewis Carroll Society of North America will be holding their Spring Meeting in April, with a series of talks taking place here at Hornbake library on April 15th and 16th.

This will be a rare opportunity to meet several of the illustrators featured in our exhibit Alice 150 and Counting…Selections from the Collection of Clare and August Imholtzas well as the collectors themselves. Hear about how George Walker, Oleg Lipchenko, and Tatiana Ianovskaia and other artists bring Lewis Carroll’s story to life, then discover their Alice illustrations as you tour the exhibit. Listen to an Alice song by Eva Salins or a dramatic reading of “Jabberwocky” and “The Walrus and the Carpenter”. Speakers will discuss all things Lewis Carroll and Alice in Wonderland during the two day conference, including topics like photography, Disney, fashion, psychology, and much more. Lectures will take place in Hornbake Library on the afternoon of Friday, April 15 and throughout the day on Saturday, April 16.

Additional items not currently featured in the exhibit will also be display for the frabjous festivities. A special exhibit is also on display featuring John Tenniel’s illustrations from Punch Magazine. John Tenniel, who illustrated both Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass, was well known for his work in the popular British political and satirical magazine. Throughout the years, Alice and the other Wonderland characters find their way into political commentary on parliament, international affairs, and domestic policies.

This event is open to the public. View the full program and registration information herePlease register by April 5.

See you in Wonderland!

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Spotlight on Wonderland: The March Hare

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March is here, and so is the madness! Time to butter our pocket watches and drink too much tea, as our good friend the March Hare has been known to do. When Alice first meets him, she sits down at his large tea party without being asked, much to his irritation. In a rather passive aggressive way, he makes Alice aware of her breach of etiquette.

“Have some wine,” the March Hare said in an encouraging tone.

Alice looked all around the table, but there was nothing on it but tea. “I don’t see any wine,” she remarked.

“There isn’t any,” said the March Hare.

“Then it wasn’t very civil of you to offer it,” said Alice angrily.

“It wasn’t very civil of you to sit down without being invited,” said the March Hare.”

Touche, you snarky little hare. On top of this, he and the Mad Hatter eventually try to stuff the poor sleepy little dormouse into a teapot.

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What do you think of the March Hare’s manners? How do they stack up among the mad characters in Wonderland?

Did You Know:

  • Tenniel drew straw in the March Hare’s hair to show that he was mad. In England, hares were thought to go mad in Spring. Straw was a symbol of madness.
  • In The Nursery Alice, Carroll wrote, “that’s the March Hare with the long ears, and straws mixed up with his hair. The straws showed he was mad–I don’t know why. Never twist up straws among your hair, for fear people should think you’re mad!”
  • The March Hare’s house, often seen in the background of illustrations of the Mad Tea Party, features chimneys shaped like rabbit ears and a roof thatched with fur.

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Visit the Maryland Room gallery in Hornbake Library from October 2105-July 2016 to explore the White Rabbit and the rest of the Wonderland cast of characters in the exhibit Alice 150 Years and County…The Legacy of Lewis Carroll: Selections from the Collection of August and Clare Imholtz.

Alice 150 Featured Item of the Month: March

Alice 150 Years and Counting…The Legacy of Lewis Carroll: Selections from the Collection of August and Clare Imholtz, is an exhibit highlighting the timelessness of Alice in Wonderland and the life and work of Lewis Carroll (1832-1898). Each month, a new item from the exhibit will be showcased.

In March, visit the Maryland Room Exhibit Gallery in Hornbake Library to view Tea With Alice: A World of Wonderland Illustration, a bilingual (Portuguese and English) catalog of Oxford Story Museum’s 2013 exhibition curated by Ju Godinho and Eduardo Filipe.

The portfolio features illustrations from Alice in Wonderland reinvisioned by 21 artists from around the world. Many of the drawings have not been published elsewhere such as Lisa Nanni’s White Rabbit’s House and Lucie Laroche’s Miro-esque tea party.

View all the featured items of the month from Alice 150 Years and Counting…The Legacy of Lewis Carroll here.

Curator Pick: Favorite Item from the Alice 150 Exhibit

Shorthand1My favorite item from the Alice 150 exhibit is a small, bright yellow booklet – a transliteration of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland into Pitman shorthand. This version of Alice was printed in 1965 and is written in New Era Pitman, a style of shorthand soon to go out of fashion with the introduction of the “shorterhand” Pitman 2000 in 1975.

Pitman shorthand utilizes a set of symbols that represent phonetic sounds. These sounds are then strung together to create a words, phrases, and punctuation. Reading shorthand is sort of like playing the game Mad Gab, but a LOT harder.

Let me clarify that I do not know how to read shorthand. It does, however, have a very distinct visual appearance that I recognized instantly when I saw this version of Alice. I’d seen this strange language before.

Back in 2014, we digitized a few Brooke Family letters from Special Collections that contained mysterious notes written in shorthand.

We harnessed the power of the internet via Twitter and Tumblr to try and translate them, but so far haven’t been able to read the notes. They remain an archival mystery…

I’m hoping to teach myself stenography one day. Perhaps I’ll start with Chapter Five, Advice From a Caterpillar:

 

Visit the Alice 150 and Counting exhibit in Hornbake Library to view more curious versions of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, or explore our online exhibit.


Audrey Lengel is an intern for Hornbake Library’s ‘Alice 150 Years and Counting…The Legacy of Lewis Carroll’ exhibit. She is graduating this December with her Master of Library Science from UMD’s iSchool and is interested in library outreach. Prior to attending the University of Maryland, she received her Bachelor of Arts in Rhetoric and Public Advocacy from Temple University.

Radio Preservation Task Force Conference Coming to Hornbake Library

On February 26 and 27, the Library of Congress’s Radio Preservation Task Force will host its first conference on the subjects of historical media archives, and the organization of educational and preservation initiatives on a national scale . Friday’s activities will take place downtown at the Library of Congress, and Saturday’s will be held at Hornbake Library North.

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Speakers will include numerous UMD librarians, faculty from various campus divisions, and several iSchool alum, as well as prominent archivists and scholars from throughout the United States. Highlights include panels and workshops on how archives can deal with audio materials, discussions about using digital tools to save our radio heritage, panels on how radio materials document race and gender throughout American history, and a workshop featuring three NEH representatives on how to find funding for archival projects.

Registration is free and open to the public, and can be completed by sending an e-mail to Kevin Palermo at kevinpalermo@gwmail.gwu.edu.

More information is available at the conference website.