Broadcasting the Cold War Era: Five Documents from the Craig B. Fisher Papers

Between 1945 to 1960, the number of television sets in the United States skyrocketed from an estimated ten thousand to sixty million. What was once a novelty became an integral part of everyday life for the average American. By 1960, almost ninety percent of American households had at least one television and the average person watched approximately five hours of programming each day. Television became the dominant medium for information and entertainment at the same time that Americans were engaged in the Cold War against the Soviet Union and experiencing major social and cultural transformations like the civil rights movement, second-wave feminism, the emergence of youth culture, and the environmental movement. In a time of change and uncertainty, television played an important role in shaping the political and cultural landscape.

General Electric Model 9T001 television

This General Electric Model 9T001 television from the mid-1950s is currently on display in the Mass Media & Culture meeting room.

The Craig B. Fisher papers, a recently processed addition to the Mass Media & Culture collection, documents what television was like during that pivotal era. Fisher graduated from the University of Maryland in 1954, and became an accomplished television writer, producer, and director. The collection pertains to a period of his career from 1956 to 1970 when he worked for CBS and NBC. It includes research materials, notes, outlines, proposals, scripts, budgets, press clippings, and other materials related to programs in which he was a creator or contributor. During his career, he produced television shows on a broad range of subjects, including politics, social issues, history, science, and art. This post will highlight five particularly interesting documents that are representative of the Cold War era. Continue reading

Transmitter

Transmitter-Winter_2013_CoverB

This just in: the latest news from Special Collections in Mass Media and Culture! Read the Winter 2013 edition of Transmitter, the official bulletin of the Broadcasting Archives.

Revisit television’s early days with Max Morath… Learn about the family-friendly character of Pick Temple from his correspondence… Suit up in sequins with “Queen of Super CircusMary Hartline… celebrate with the 2012 Giants of Broadcasting… and more!

Stay tuned for more great updates from Transmitter.

Testudo visits the Special Collections!

We were thrilled to have Testudo (the University of Maryland mascot) recently visit us in Special Collections! We had a lot of fun teaching him about researching primary sources, online finding tools at UMD, and the many collections available for research. He decided to create a Flickr photo-guide for using the Special Collections. Visit it at ter.ps/19h and let us know if it helps you too!

Picture of Testudo in the Special Collections