Exhibit on the Japanese Constitution

Gordon W. Prange Collection

Check out the Prange Collection exhibit of materials related to the Constitution of Japan!  “TheJapanese Constitution Turns 70!” commemorates the 70th anniversary of the Constitution’s enactment.

The exhibit is on display in the Maryland Room on the first floor of Hornbake Library North through October 2017.  Displayed items include:

  • Tentative Revision of the Meiji Constitution by Joji Matsumoto (January 4, 1946)
  • Draft Constitution of Japan (First Government Draft) (March 4, 1946)
  • Brines, Russell. (1947, May 22). Spirit of New Constitution Nullified. The Pacific Stars and Stripes.
  • Rikuzo Kamiyama. (1948). Shakai to seikatsu. Tokyo: Gakudo Ryogi Sosho Kankokai.

For more information about the Constitution, please see this series of blog posts.

View original post

Advertisements

Are You Married or Going to be Married?: The Labor Movement & the Business Woman

We are celebrating American Business Women’s Day! In the spirit of this holiday, we will be highlighting an item from the Labor History Collections’ exhibit, “For Liberty, Justice, and Equality: Unions Making History in America.”

Starting in the 1930s and 1940s, women entered the workforce en masse due to war time economic demands. Once the war was over and the men returned home, many women wanted to stay in the workforce because it gave them a newfound independence. With more women working, the labor movement had to make sure that their rights as workers were protected, as well as the already established rights centered on male workers.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The photos above are examples of the various jobs that women were employed in during the time war efforts. Still Images, Photographic Prints.

Continue reading

The Equal Rights Amendment: Labor’s Fight for True Gender Equality

Today we are celebrating National Women’s Equality Day! Gender equality in the workplace is a social justice issue that the labor movement has always been involved in.  In the spirit of this holiday, we will be highlighting some of the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) items that will be featured in the Labor History Collections’ exhibit, “For Liberty, Justice, and Equality: Unions Making History in America”!

Continue reading

Visit New Football Exhibit

Terrapin Tales

Calling all Terps fans! A new exhibit in Hornbake Library’s Maryland Room features a selection of photos, programs, pennants, uniforms, and more from the University Archives’ collections commemorating the football team’s 125th year. From the team’s humble beginning in 1892 to today, our Maryland Terrapins have created many memorable moments including 11 conference championships, 27 […]

via New exhibit celebrates 125 years of Maryland football — Special Collections and University Archives at UMD

View original post

Best of the Building Campaign

For the past several weeks we have been delving into the history of various buildings on campus through Instagram (@hornbakelibrary)! Here we will recap a few of our favorite features.

We chose buildings based on:

  • An interesting or unusual name
  • An unrecognizable name
  • The importance of the building to UMD students

Feature buildings included Taliaferro Hall, Preinkert Hall, H.J Patterson Hall, The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center, Tawes Hall, and Van Munching Hall.

Taliaferro Hall—one of particular interest to many students because seemingly no one knows the correct pronunciation. That is, aside from the history professors whose offices reside in this building and who are quick to correct any mispronunciation! It is regionally pronounced “Tolliver.” The beautiful and often overlooked building on South Campus was built in 1899. At the time it was home to the School of Engineering, which is why it was named after Thomas Hardy Taliaferro, Dean of the College of Engineering and College of Arts and Sciences.

The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center – this consortium of 10 interconnected structures is the largest single building ever constructed in the State of Maryland. It was named for artist and alumna Clarice Smith who was a notable water color painter, and spread her talents by teaching in the D.C. area and funding our performing arts center!

Continue reading

Exploring Labor’s History Through the AFL-CIO Poster Collection: A Blog Series (Part 4)

labor-061750-0001

One of the more unexpected items in the collection are two objects from student protests in Paris. 1968 was a tumultuous year in France which saw radical student demonstrations erupt in Paris. Most notably, students held demonstrations and occupied their universities in opposition to Charles de Gaulle. The first item depicts de Gaulle with the now iconic phrase “Le Chienlit C’est Lui!” (one translation: “He is the chaos”.) The phrase appropriates a pun de Gaulle made in a speech.  The second, larger item was created by a student group at the Sorbonne, a Parisian university, la Coordination des Comités d’Action. The poster criticizes de Gaulle along with Georges Pompidou, the president, and Christian Fouchet, the interior minister, claiming “Les provocateurs ce son eux!” (They are the agents of violence)

Contact us at askhornbake@umd.edu for more information about our Labor Collections.


Benjamin Bradley is a second year MLIS student in the College of Information Studies at the University of Maryland. He works in the Labor Collections at UMD’s Special Collections and University Archives. You can also find him over in McKeldin Library where he is the GA for Electronic Resources.

Exploring Labor’s History Through the AFL-CIO Poster Collection: A Blog Series (Part 3)

labor-061752-0001

The above poster was created decades after the one before. AFL-CIO presidents George Meany and Lane Kirkland made opposing South Africa’s policy of apartheid a major aspect of their tenure. The poster depicted above is from a series of rallies organized by the AFL-CIO called the “Day of Solidarity With the Victims of Apartheid.” The AFL-CIO held a rally in DC along with other cities across the United States, and it memorialized the 26th anniversary of the Sharpeville massacre in South Africa. The AFL-CIO also encouraged union members to participate in other protest activities such as cutting up their Shell credit cards and mailing them to the AFL-CIO headquarters. For me, not only does this poster help represent the scope of the collection, but it demonstrates the scope of the AFL-CIO, how the organization has changed throughout history and how its mission has led it to work towards national and international goals.

Contact us at askhornbake@umd.edu for more information about this collection in our Labor Collections.

 

Benjamin Bradley is a second year MLIS student in the College of Information Studies at the University of Maryland. He works in the Labor Collections at UMD’s Special Collections and University Archives. You can also find him over in McKeldin Library where he is the GA for Electronic Resources.