A Look Back at 2016

With 2017 right around the corner, it’s the perfect time to reminisce on all the happenings that shaped Special Collections and University Archives in 2015!

We’ve posted stories on new acquisitionsexhibits and events like Alice 150 and Maryland Day, and also UMD class visits to Special Collections and University Archives.

Take a trip back in the year with the top 10 blog posts with the most views in 2016:

  1. Heavy Metal Parking Lot and the Jeff Krulik Collection
  2. Explore ‘Heavy Metal Parking Lot’ at UMD!
  3. AFL-CIO Merger
  4. 130 Years of Progress: The Bakery, Confectionery, Tobacco Workers and Grain Millers International Union, 1886-2016
  5. LGBT Advocacy and the AFL-CIO
  6. AFL-CIO Artifact Project: Summer 2016
  7. Spotlight on Wonderland: The March Hare
  8. Minikins Miss Dot Sr. and Miss Dot Jr. Return to Campus after a Half-Century
  9. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Speech to AFL-CIO
  10. Spotlight on Wonderland: The Dormouse

Here’s a shout out to posts that were published in previous years, but still rank among our most viewed posts this year:

  1. William Morris, Walter Crane, and Socialist Art
  2. Books Published Before 1850
  3. Featured Novelist from Special Collections: Ferdinand Reyher
  4. Achievements and Milestones in UMD Athletics
  5. Edgar Allan Poe in Special Collections

Is there something you want to learn about Special Collections and University Archives in 2017? Let us know in the comments!

Remembering E. Barrett Prettyman

On November 4, 2016, E. Barret Prettyman Jr. (1925-2016) passed away. He was a well-known attorney with an impressive legacy that spans international relations, civil rights, literature, and more. He also holds an interesting connection to American author Katherine Anne Porter and the University of Maryland.

You care about Prettyman if you care about important Supreme Court cases like Brown versus Board of Education, the landmark case that desegregated public schools, and for which Prettyman served as on the advisory council for in 1954. You care about Prettyman if you care about the 1962 release of American prisoners taken during Bay of Pigs crisis during which Prettyman successfully negotiated with then Cuban President Fidel Castro for their return and safe release. You care about Prettyman if you are at all concerned with the House Ethics committee, the First Ammendment, and the death penalty. Over the course of his long legal career, Prettyman became heavily involved with all of these areas of the legal system. The obituaries in the Washington Post and New York Times illustrate his storied career and commitment to the legal system.

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Portrait of Prettyman inscribed to Porter: “For Katherine Anne, With happy memories of lovely, relaxed, and fiery reminiscent afternoons of good talk in the best of company, and with love, Barrett”

As the one of the repositories of Prettyman’s personal papers, Special Collections and University Archives at UMD holds not only the documents that reveal Prettyman’s legal Continue reading

Special Collections Opens Their Doors

This semester we hosted an Open House for University staff and displayed some of the interesting material found within our collection.

Uncle Tom's Cabin

Uncle Tom’s Cabin

Three of these items came from our literary collection and included an early edition of Uncle Tom’s Cabin, an inscribed copy of Mark Twain’s Sketches, New and Old, and a 1794 edition of A Vindication of the Rights of Women. These early editions provided insights into the times in which they were produced through their format, inscriptions or by the significance of their ownership. Much can be learned by looking at original copies of common works.

students_400If you would like to talk to us about using our collections for your own research or to support your instruction, please let us know. We often work with faculty and look forward to the opportunity to get to know you and your students.

Research queries to askhornbake@umd.edu
Instruction support queries to lcleary@umd.edu

A Vindication of the Rights of Women

A Vindication of the Rights of Women

Mark Twain's Sketches, New and Old

Mark Twain’s Sketches, New and Old

Versions of a book from manuscript through various publications

Versions of a book from manuscript through various publications

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Student Job Opportunities in Special Collections and University Archives!

Want to pursue a career as a librarian or archivist? Do you love libraries and “old stuff”? Are you detail-oriented? Looking for a job on campus? Good news,  Special Collections and University Archives is hiring student assistants!

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Student assistants in Special Collections and University Archives at UMD are exposed to a wide variety of public and behind-the-scenes elements of the special collection library/archival field.  They work closely with curators and library staff to make accessible some of the University’s most valuable research collections.

Our collections cover a wide variety of subjects/formats, including literary manuscripts and rare books, UMD history, labor history, the state of Maryland and historical collections, mass media and culture, and women’s history.

Primary responsibilities may include:

  • Assisting patrons in the Maryland Room and serving on the Hornbake Welcome Desk.
  • Processing Special Collections materials, including book, archival, and/or digital collections.
  • Contributing to special projects, events, and exhibits.

Knowledge, experience, or strong interest in one or more of the following is preferred: archives; book processing; reference.

Applicants must be detailed oriented and able to maintain a schedule of 15-20 hours per week. This is an hourly position only; not a graduate assistantship. The University of Maryland is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

Contact Amer Kohl at amberk@umd.edu with questions about student positions in Special Collections and University Archives.

To apply please send a cover letter and resume to Amber Kohl at amberk@umd.edu.

LINK Fall 2016 | UMD Libraries

LINK Fall 2016 | UMD Libraries

The LINK
Fall 2016

Previous LINK issues >>

Journals targeted for cancellation in 2017

In order to avoid a budget deficit, subject librarians have canceled several research databases and reduced funds for discretionary monograph purchases across all disciplines.

Next up:  Canceling subscriptions to journals not part of contractually protected “big deal” packages purchased in collaboration with consortial partners at significant discount.

A review of serials conducted by librarians in consultation with collegiate faculty in spring 2016 identified cancellations at levels of 8 percent of the total collections budget.

A flat budget and significant serials inflation conspired to create the deficit.

Please contact Daniel Mack, Associate Dean, Collection Strategies and Services, (dmack@umd.edu) with questions about collections.

Severn Library up and running

A crew dedicated to retrieving library materials from Severn Library is now fulfilling requests for items shelved in the newly operational facility. Materials are delivered to McKeldin Library within one to two days of the request.

Materials transferred to Severn Library over the summer were previously held in the offsite shelving at the Johns Hopkins Library Services Center (aka MOSS). The October opening of Severn Library greatly expands shelving capacity for the University Libraries and ensures materials are maintained in optimal environmental conditions.

Severn Library is a high-density, climate-controlled facility for the long-term preservation of valuable books and archival materials. Located on Greenbelt Road, the facility will eventually hold approximately three million volumes.

Apply for funds to publish in open access journals

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Frederick Douglass Exhibit Coming Soon to Hornbake Library

The new exhibit Frederick Douglass & Wye House: Archaeology and African American Culture in Maryland will be opening soon in the Maryland Room exhibit gallery in Hornbake Library.

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Thousands of African and African American families were enslaved in Maryland for almost 250 years. Little evidence of their daily lives was preserved which leaves many questions about how they created a vital and distinct culture.

The University of Maryland seeks to answer questions about the origins of the nation including the contributions of African Americans. In the Department of Anthropology, archaeologists investigate Maryland’s landscapes to collect historical evidence and reveal new knowledge about the African American experience. At Wye House plantation, researchers utilized the words and work of Frederick Douglass to help answer the questions of today’s descendants of enslaved people.

By understanding past relationships to the natural environment and religions, University of Maryland archaeologists are discovering how African and European traditions creatively merged over four centuries to form a unique Maryland culture.

Visit Hornbake Library September 2016-July 2017 to explore this fascinating exhibit and learn more about the life and times of Frederick Douglass.

LGBT Advocacy and the AFL-CIO

This June, city streets in America will bloom with colorful celebrations. Pride, this year, marks the 47th anniversary of Stonewall, and the first year since Obergefell v. Hodges. While most of those celebrating are no stranger to the struggle for equality, it can be easy to forget the struggle of the past and the struggles still needed today. Pride at Work, the AFL-CIO LGBT constituency group, and its members have been fighting for LGBT equality since before the organization was founded in 1994. Today, Pride at Work, along with the labor movement, continues the fight for LGBT rights and equality for all workers.

Pride at work is also celebrating its 22nd anniversary this month. On June 24th, 1994, LGBT union activists gathered in New York City to remember the 25th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots. In New York, this network of activists held “The Founding Conference of the Lesbian, Gay, Bi-sexual and Transgender People in the Labor Movement” creating the organization known today as Pride at Work. Three years later, in 1997, it became one of the seven official constituency groups of the AFL-CIO.

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