Heavy Metal Parking Lot and the Jeff Krulik Collection

When aspiring filmmakers Jeff Krulik and John Heyn visited the Capital Centre parking lot on May 31, 1986, they had little more in mind than to document a fan scene at full peak. What they ended up creating was a cult film now considered among the greatest rock documentaries of all time. Just under 17 minutes long, Heavy Metal Parking Lot features local heavy metal fans expressing their enthusiasm for Judas Priest before the band performed in concert that night. Thirty years later, the film continues to resonate with fans around the globe.

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The University of Maryland is proud to honor both the legacy of the film and that of its co-producer. Jeff Krulik, a lifetime Marylander and graduate of UMD (B.A. English, 1983), is an independent documentarian, videographer and cultural preservationist who has built a distinct career tapping into the rich ore of local culture in the Maryland/D.C. region. In 1996, the Washington Post noted that his esteemed documentaries “demonstrate a loving eye for Americana and eccentricity.”

Krulik, Maryland Alumni Magazine, Spring 2001, photo by John ConsoliThe Jeff Krulik Collection, acquired by Mass Media & Culture collections within the UMD Libraries’ Special Collections and University Archives in November 2015, includes research files and source tapes for more than a dozen documentaries, as well as photos, catalogs, magazines, guides, posters, ephemera and audiovisual materials that represent a lifetime fascination with the offbeat and unusual. The collection is currently being processed, and will be available to researchers within the next two years.

To celebrate the 30th anniversary of Krulik’s most iconic film, the exhibit “Heavy Metal Parking Lot: The 30-Year Journey of a Cult Film Sensation”, opening next month in the Gallery at the Michelle Smith Performing Arts Library, illustrates the film’s unexpected path from bootleg copies to international fame. Additional items from the Krulik Collection will also be on display.

Please join us for the opening reception in the the Pavilion of the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center on May 27 from 6-8:30pm. This lively event will feature short presentations by film scholars, a screening of the film and a Q&A session with Jeff Krulik and John Heyn.

Click here for more information.

Spotlight on Wonderland: The Duchess

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With a frustrating mix of rain, wind, sunshine, pollen, and taxes, the month of April is certainly reminiscent of the volatile tempers of the Duchess. Blustery then blithe, raucous then regal, the duchess is an absolute mess of contrary and contrasting emotions.

When Alice first walks into the Duchess’ home, she notes the distinct and overwhelming aroma of peppery soup, followed by the sound of howling and sneezing. These sounds arise from the duchess and her baby sitting in the middle of the room, feeling the effects of an overzealous cook.

`There’s certainly too much pepper in that soup!’ Alice said to herself, as well as she could for sneezing.

There was certainly too much of it in the air. Even the Duchess sneezed occasionally; and as for the baby, it was sneezing and howling alternately without a moment’s pause. The only things in the kitchen that did not sneeze, were the cook, and a large cat which was sitting on the hearth and grinning from ear to ear.

When Alice attempts to calm the cacophonous kitchen, she is rebuked. “If everybody minded their own business,” the Duchess said, in a hoarse growl, “the world wound go round a good deal faster than it does.” Not long after, the Duchess all but flings her child into Alice’s arms in her haste to get ready for the Queen of Hearts’ croquet game.

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But this is not all we see of the Duchess. Later, at the croquet game, she appears again in a completely different state of mind and attitude. It is not hard to understand why Alice feels something akin to whiplash when she is greeted again.

`You can’t think how glad I am to see you again, you dear old thing!’ said the Duchess, as she tucked her arm affectionately into Alice’s, and they walked off together.

Alice was very glad to find her in such a pleasant temper, and thought to herself that perhaps it was only the pepper that had made her so savage when they met in the kitchen.

In the dialogue that follows, the Duchess reveals that she can find a moral in absolutely anything. Inevitably, when these morals are stated, they cause the reader’s eyes to cross.

Would you rather encounter a cantankerous Duchess or a short-tempered Queen in Wonderland?

Did you Know:

  • Tenniel’s illustration of the Duchess may be based on a 14th century painting of Margaret Maultasch, Countess of Tyrol, which is titled ‘The Ugly Duchess’.
  • The Cheshire Cat belongs to the Duchess. You can see it in the background of illustrations of her kitchen. When Alice asks why her cat grins, the Duchess, in her usual huffy manner, replies “It’s a Cheshire cat…and that’s why.”

Visit the Maryland Room gallery in Hornbake Library from October 2105-July 2016 to discover more about the Duchess and the rest of the Wonderland cast of characters in the exhibit Alice 150 Years and County…The Legacy of Lewis Carroll: Selections from the Collection of August and Clare Imholtz.

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‘Alice Goes to the Movies’ Returns!

Hornbake Library is excited to announce a three-part film series- Alice Goes to the Movies. Don’t miss this rare opportunity to see early Alice films and learn about how they were saved from the passage of time. David H. Schaefer, longtime Lewis Carroll collector and Alice film expert, will be sharing some of the highlights of his Alice film collection and discussing the process of restoring and digitizing them.

Join us on April 21st from 4:30-6:00pm in Hornbake Library, Room 0302H for our second film night. Dr. Schaffer will be opening the film series with a brief introduction on the role of “non-theatrical” motion pictures in contributing to the popularity of the Alice stories.  Afterward, munch on popcorn as we watch the 1915 silent film Alice in Wonderland, directed by W.W. Young. The sequence from the 1930 classic Putin’ on the Ritz,  featuring Joan Bennett dancing through Wonderland, will also be shown.

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All are welcome – unless you are the Queen of Hearts! Whether you are interested in learning about film preservation or are one of many Alice fans, you are certain to enjoy a one-of-a-kind adventure in Wonderland. Directions and parking information can be found online.

Don’t forget to visit our Alice 150 Years and Counting: Legacy of Lewis Carroll exhibit, currently on display in Hornbake Library, to explore all things Alice.

If you are a film/theater/music fan, don’t miss the exhibit Alice in the Performing Arts, now on display in the Lowens Reading Room at the Peforming Arts Library. This companion exhibit features unique Alice film items, like this book of previously unpublished Walt Disney illustrations.

Visit our online exhibit and take a look at some of the illustrations inside this and other Alice items on display!

Alice 150 Featured Item of the Month: April

Alice 150 Years and Counting…The Legacy of Lewis Carroll: Selections from the Collection of August and Clare Imholtz, is an exhibit highlighting the timelessness of Alice in Wonderland and the life and work of Lewis Carroll (1832-1898). Each month, a new item from the exhibit will be showcased.

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In April, visit the Maryland Room Exhibit Gallery in Hornbake Library to view a humorous letter from Charles L. Dodgson (Lewis Carroll).

In the letter, Carroll declines an invitation to an “At Home” party. Be sure to note the purple ink in which the letter is written (a trademark of Lewis Carroll). Carroll made a point of avoiding “At Homes” in which hosts would designate a time for visiting—having said on another occasion, “I dread and shun all such hosts of strangers.”

View all the featured items of the month from Alice 150 Years and Counting…The Legacy of Lewis Carroll here.

Organizing for Power and Workers’ Rights in the Twenty-First Century Symposium

On April 14, 2016, University Libraries’ Special Collections in Labor History & Workplace Studies will co-sponsor a symposium exploring workers and organizing in the twenty-first century. This event is open and free to the public. All are welcome to attend!

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Attacks on the freedom to organize in the last several decades have created new challenges for working people. New creative approaches have consequently emerged in sectors across the economy such as in domestic care, fast food, big box merchandising, etc. This symposium seeks to examine all those areas while also placing them within the context of a rapidly globalizing environment.

Elizabeth Shuler, Secretary-Treasurer of the AFL-CIO, will present the keynote address. Panelists include Eileen Boris, Teresa Casertano, Lane Windham, Elly Kugler, Nelson Lichtenstein, and Fekkak Mamdouh.

Afterwards, all are invited to join a reception in Hornbake Library, where attendees can enjoy light hors d’oeuvres and view items from UMD’s labor history collections as well as from the Gordon W. Prange Collection of Occupation-era Japanese print publications.

See a full schedule and more information, and join us on April 14th!

Alice Goes to the Movies!

CarolMarsh1.pngAlmost everyone has seen Disney’s famous 1951 film adaptation of Alice in Wonderland, and fans of Johnny Depp are sure to have seen him starring as the Mad Hatter in Tim Burton’s 2010 adaptation. But did you know that since 1903, over 35 films and television programs have reinterpreted Alice?

Hornbake Library is excited to announce a three-part film series- Alice Goes to the Movies. Don’t miss this rare opportunity to see early Alice films and learn about how they were saved from the passage of time. David H. Schaefer, longtime Lewis Carroll collector and Alice film expert, will be sharing some of the highlights of his Alice film collection and discussing the process of restoring and digitizing them.

Join us on April 7th from 4:30-6:00pm in Hornbake Library, Room 0302H for our first film night. Dr. Schaffer will be opening the film series with a brief introduction titled “Did Lewis Carroll ever see a motion picture?“.  Afterward, munch on popcorn as we watch the two earliest, silent film adaptations of Alice from 1903 and 1910. We’ll wrap up the night with the 1933 cartoon Betty in Wonderland, where director Dave Fleischer sends Betty Boop to Wonderland via the subway.

Alice at the Movies Flyer

All are welcome – unless you are the Queen of Hearts! Whether you are interested in learning about film preservation or are one of many Alice fans, you are certain to enjoy a one-of-a-kind adventure in Wonderland. Directions and parking information can be found online.

Don’t forget to visit our Alice 150 Years and Counting: Legacy of Lewis Carroll exhibit, currently on display in Hornbake Library, to explore all things Alice. If you are a film/theater/music fan, don’t miss the exhibit AHall1lice in the Performing Arts, now on display in the Lowens Reading Room at the Peforming Arts Library. This companion exhibit features unique Alice film items, like this book of previously unpublished Walt Disney illustrations. Visit our online exhibit and take a look at some of the illustrations inside this and other Alice items on display!

 

 

The Lewis Carroll Society of North America is Coming to Hornbake!

RabbitLogoSmRA one-of-a-kind event is coming to Special Collections and University Archives and all are invited to attend! The Lewis Carroll Society of North America will be holding their Spring Meeting in April, with a series of talks taking place here at Hornbake library on April 15th and 16th.

This will be a rare opportunity to meet several of the illustrators featured in our exhibit Alice 150 and Counting…Selections from the Collection of Clare and August Imholtzas well as the collectors themselves. Hear about how George Walker, Oleg Lipchenko, and Tatiana Ianovskaia and other artists bring Lewis Carroll’s story to life, then discover their Alice illustrations as you tour the exhibit. Listen to an Alice song by Eva Salins or a dramatic reading of “Jabberwocky” and “The Walrus and the Carpenter”. Speakers will discuss all things Lewis Carroll and Alice in Wonderland during the two day conference, including topics like photography, Disney, fashion, psychology, and much more. Lectures will take place in Hornbake Library on the afternoon of Friday, April 15 and throughout the day on Saturday, April 16.

Additional items not currently featured in the exhibit will also be display for the frabjous festivities. A special exhibit is also on display featuring John Tenniel’s illustrations from Punch Magazine. John Tenniel, who illustrated both Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass, was well known for his work in the popular British political and satirical magazine. Throughout the years, Alice and the other Wonderland characters find their way into political commentary on parliament, international affairs, and domestic policies.

This event is open to the public. View the full program and registration information herePlease register by April 5.

See you in Wonderland!

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