Are You Married or Going to be Married?: The Labor Movement & the Business Woman

We are celebrating American Business Women’s Day! In the spirit of this holiday, we will be highlighting an item from the Labor History Collections’ exhibit, “For Liberty, Justice, and Equality: Unions Making History in America.”

Starting in the 1930s and 1940s, women entered the workforce en masse due to war time economic demands. Once the war was over and the men returned home, many women wanted to stay in the workforce because it gave them a newfound independence. With more women working, the labor movement had to make sure that their rights as workers were protected, as well as the already established rights centered on male workers.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The photos above are examples of the various jobs that women were employed in during the time war efforts. Still Images, Photographic Prints.

Continue reading

Advertisements

A Look at Labor Day 1964

Today is Labor Day, and political, religious, and community leaders will give speeches to commemorate the day.  For labor leaders, it’s an opportunity to appeal to the working class.  Every working person is affected in some way by state and federal labor laws, and bargaining agreements that set wages and benefits at their place of employment.  Striving to establish workers’ rights and to improve them has been a common cause of the labor movement since the late 19th century, marked by the formation of the American Federation of Labor in 1886 and by federal approval of Labor Day as a national holiday in 1894.  Continue reading

The Equal Rights Amendment: Labor’s Fight for True Gender Equality

Today we are celebrating National Women’s Equality Day! Gender equality in the workplace is a social justice issue that the labor movement has always been involved in.  In the spirit of this holiday, we will be highlighting some of the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) items that will be featured in the Labor History Collections’ exhibit, “For Liberty, Justice, and Equality: Unions Making History in America”!

Continue reading

Upcoming Exhibit: Fall 2017

For Liberty, Justice, and Equality: Unions Making History in America

Opening in September, we are pleased to present Hornbake Library’s first major exhibit about labor history.  The exhibit will feature materials from the AFL-CIO Archive that were transferred to University of Maryland’s Special Collections four years ago in 2013.

ExhibitPoster_FinalRev2

The exhibit explores the labor movement’s involvement with issues of economic equality, including the struggle for the eight-hour day and a living wage; reveals its deep roots with the civil rights’ and women’s movements; and documents lesser-known connections with the movements for LGBTQ equality, immigrant rights, religious freedom, environmental justice and international workers’ solidarity.

We hope you will join us as we explore how the labor movement has evolved from discriminatory positions to progressive ones, fighting for equality for all people. Hundreds of unique documents, images, videos, and artifacts will be on display from the Labor History Collections within the Special Collections and University Archives at the University of Maryland Libraries.

The exhibition will run from September 2017 – July 2018 in the Maryland Room Exhibit Gallery, located in Hornbake Library at the University of Maryland, College Park.

For more information, email us at askhornbake@umd.edu, and visit the online exhibition.

Follow us here, on Twitter, and Instagram to learn more about the exhibit.
@hornbakelibrary #UMDlabor

LGBTQ Resources in Special Collections and University Archives

Looking to explore LGBTQ history, literature, and activism? We have lot of resources in Special Collections and University Archives that will pique your interest.

University Archives Collections

Gay Student Alliance – The Gay Student Alliance (GSA) was established at the University of Maryland in the 1970s as the successor of the Student Homophile Association (SHA). This collection contains newspaper clippings and editorials from the Diamondback chronicling the campus response to the gay community during the 1970s.

Continue reading

Nancy Wohlforth: Uniting the Labor and LGBT Movements

“Since 1979, when the Gay and Lesbian Labor Alliance was formed, Nancy Wohlforth has been working to bring gay issues into the labor movement. Now the organization is called Pride At Work and is a full-fledged constituency group in the AFL-CIO. National cochair Wohlforth and the newly hired executive director, Kipukai Kuali’i, will fight for domestic-partner pension benefits, greater employment protection, and transgender inclusion. They also want gays and lesbians to understand the power and benefit of unions. ‘Frankly, a lot of people still see the union as a bunch of old white boys who want nothing to do with their interests,’ Wohlforth says, ‘clearly that’s not the case.’

-The Advocate on Nancy Wohlforth in the Best and Brightest Activists collection, August 17, 1999. Continue reading

Pride in the Labor Movement

Labor_Module10_LGBTQ_PrideAtWork_Poster

Pride at Work national convention poster by Ricardo Lewis Morales, Northland Poster Collective, San Diego, 2006. Pride at Work Records.

In honor of Pride Month, we are featuring items from the Labor Collections at Special Collections and University Archives that highlight the role of the LGBTQ+ community in the labor movement. This particular item will be on display in the upcoming exhibit, “For Liberty, Justice, and Equality: Unions Making History in America” opening October 2017.  LGBTQ+ people of all types are involved in every aspect of labor, although labor unions ignored or excluded them until recent decades. The Pride at Work poster calls attention to the role the diverse LGBTQ+ community played in American history and American labor history and demonstrates a reversal of labor union policy towards LGBTQ+ people.

Continue reading