New Resource: 19th Century Literature Libguide

Even if you have never studied literature you are likely familiar with authors like Ralph Waldo Emerson or Charles Dickens.  While these authors may have written in different styles and about different subject matter, they were among the most notable authors of the 19th century.  To learn more about Emerson, Dickens, and other notable writers of the 19th century take a look at our new libguide on 19th Century Literature!

The libguide draws attention to some of the main collecting areas for Literature and Rare Books, such as illustrated works.  Hornbake’s holdings include a variety of different kinds of illustrated works that were popular in the 19th century, from scientific illustrations (Thomas Bewick’s woodcut portrayals of animals) to satirical illustrations (Punch Magazine).  The libguide also features highlights from our collection of 19th century literature, such as books published by Kelmscott Press, which reacted against the consumerism and mass production of the late 19th century by producing expensive, high quality books that doubled as works of art.

This guide also provides a list of notable works published in Britain, the United States, and France throughout the 19th century.  During the 19th century social movements such as abolitionism, women’s suffrage, temperance, and the worker’s rights movement challenged the traditional social order.  New scientific advancements and theories offered both a higher quality of life and caused people to question long-established beliefs. 

This guide highlights some of the works available from the Literature and Rare Books collection in Special Collections and University Archives, located in Hornbake Library.  

If you have questions or want to explore more of our 19th Century holdings contact us

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